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I need a RegEx to match the following:

1.234.567
-1.234.789
1234567
-1234567

It should not match:

.123     (leading separator)
123..456 (two separators)

In other words, I need a RegEx to match long numeric values formatted with or without thousand separators.

Thanks!

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1  
Is the thousand seperator always a dot . ? –  Chandu Jun 6 '11 at 6:49
    
You can assume that. –  Olav Haugen Jun 6 '11 at 6:50
    
sounds a little like homework –  Jim Deville Jun 6 '11 at 6:57
    
Nope, it's not homework. I'm trying to ignore invalid user inputs from a TextBox in WPF. –  Olav Haugen Jun 6 '11 at 7:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Here is a more restricted answer

^-?(?!0)(?:\d+|\d{1,3}(?:\.\d{3})+)$

See it online here at Regexr

(?!0) prevents from starting with 0

\d+ allows the numbers without separator

\d{1,3}(?:.\d{3})+ is the part for the separator. Start with 1 to 3 numbers, then a separator and 3 numbers. The dot for the separator followed by 3 numbers can be repeated.

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Thanks! +1 for giving a more elaborate description. –  Olav Haugen Jun 6 '11 at 8:55
    
how about 0.2 ? –  danip Nov 12 '13 at 14:02

You could do something like

^-?([0-9]{1,3}\.?)+$

RegExr Demo

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Thanks! And a +1 for linking to demo with examples. –  Olav Haugen Jun 6 '11 at 7:08
    
@Olav @bazmegakapa are you aware that this matches also 0.0.0and 1.23.45 and 1. ? –  stema Jun 6 '11 at 7:50
    
@stema I am. For client-side validation, it suffices. Yours is nicer of course, but a bit overkill to me. –  kapa Jun 6 '11 at 7:56
    
Went with @stema's answer as it covers more what I was looking for. –  Olav Haugen Jun 6 '11 at 8:57
    
@Olav No worries of course :). –  kapa Jun 6 '11 at 8:59

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