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I have a bunch of functions which read completely identical except for one line of code, which is different depending on the type of input parameter.

Example:

void Func(std::vector<int> input)
{
   DoSomethingGeneral1();
   ...
   DoSomethingSpecialWithStdVector(input);
   ...
   DoSomethingGeneral2();
}

void Func(int input)
{
   DoSomethingGeneral1();
   ...
   DoSomethingSpecialWithInt(input);
   ...
   DoSomethingGeneral2();
}

void Func(std::string input)
{
   DoSomethingGeneral1();
   ...
   DoSomethingSpecialWithStdString(input);
   ...
   DoSomethingGeneral2();
}

I wonder how I could avoid this duplication using a template-like mechanism. If I understand "specialization" correctly, it does not avoid to have the code of the specialized functions twice?

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1  
We can't take a bold step unless knowing what DoSomethingSpecial is really supposed to do. Can you give more details? If not really suitable to template-ize it, we will have to some work around to make it inside a general interfaces and tweak it from the caller's perspective. –  sarat Jun 6 '11 at 7:00
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5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

here you go.. changed the parameters to references to avoid copies + assure you can use the changed values again in Func()

void DoSomethingSpecial( std::vector<int>& input ){}

void DoSomethingSpecial( int& input ){}

void DoSomethingSpecial( std::string& input ){}

template< typename T >
void Func( T input )
{
  DoSomethingGeneral1();
  DoSomethingSpecial(input);
  DoSomethingGeneral2();
}
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I believe there is no need for template speciaization, you can use simple function overloading, something like this:

void DoSomethingSpecial(const std::vector<int>& input)
{
}

void DoSomethingSpecial(string s)
{
}

void DoSomethingSpecial(int input)
{
}
template <typename T>
void Func(const T& input)
{
  //DoSomethingGeneral1();
   DoSomethingSpecial(input);
   //DoSomethingGeneral2();
}

int main()
{
    std::vector<int> a;
    Func(a);
    Func("abc");
    Func(10);
}
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thanks - I simply could not believe this would work, but it does! :) –  Jakob S. Jun 6 '11 at 7:21
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The best way is to make Func as template:

template<typename T>
void Func(T input);

And overload the DoSomethingSpecial...():

void DoSomethingSpecial(std::string);
void DoSomethingSpecial(int);
void DoSomethingSpecial(std::vector<int>);
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As a matter of style, you might want to draw out the parts that are different as a trivial template class that is more easily specialized. As an example of this technique, consider your favorite template implementation of an unordered set (or hash_set). Such implementations require you to specialize a simple hash_key< T > template if there isn't a specialization already available. They don't require you to specialize the complete container.

Although your example is simple enough to just specialize the whole function, in general I would implement Func< T > generically and specialize DoSomethingSpecial< T > like so:

template< class T >
void DoSomethingSpecial(T &input)
{
...
}

template< class T >
void Func(T input)
{
DoSomethingGeneral1();
...
DoSomethingSpecial(T);
...
DoSomethingGeneral2();
}

template<>
void DoSomethingSpecial(std::string &input)
{
...
}

template<>
void DoSomethingSpecial(int &input)
{
...
}
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i'll consider this, thanks. –  Jakob S. Jun 6 '11 at 7:21
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Declare a generic version but only define specializations:

template<class T>
void DoSpecificStuff( T& withWhat );

template<>
void DoSpecificStuff( int& withWhat)
{
    //implementation
}

template<>
void DoSpecificStuff( std::vector<int>& withWhat)
{
    //implementation
}
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