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Using git add command becomes tedious once the file path becomes lengthy. For e.g. git add src_test/com/abc/product/server/datasource/manager/aats/DSManger.java
Is it possible to bypass specifying absolute file path? May be using some kind of pattern or something?

I know that we can use git gui. But I want to do it using cmd line.

Thanks in advance for the inputs.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted

For unix-like systems you can always use the star to point to files, e.g.

 git add *DSManager.java

will include all DSManager.java files git can find within your source tree starting in your current working directory.

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1  
Apparently, this ONLY adds newly created files, but skipps modified files. Any reason for that? –  Vaman Kulkarni Jun 6 '11 at 8:51
2  
For me this also works with modified files. Maybe this depends on the git version, bash version, operating system. I don't know. I'm on OSX 10.6 with git 1.7.5.4 and bash 4.2.10(2). –  Steffen Jun 6 '11 at 9:41

With bash, you can set "globstar" (shopt -s globstar) and then do:

git add **/DSManger.java

to add all files called DSManager.java present below the current directory.

(**/ matches all directories and subdirectories.)

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That's actually the nicer solution, since it only includes files called DSManager.java and omits files called OtherDSManager.java. However, your shell has to support the globstar option. –  Steffen Jun 6 '11 at 7:42

I'm not sure if I understand your question.

To add all files (not yet added), use:

git add .

If you need to add all but one file, you cold add all, then remove the files using:

git reset HEAD <file>

You can also add all files in a subdirectory with

git add subdir/

One thing that I know can be annoying is when you rename files, you need to add the new filename and git rm the old name. When renaming a directory this can be annoying. This (unix only) git alias solves this problem (put it in your ~/.gitconfig file:

[alias] ;add after this heading or create this heading if it does not exist
        addremove = !git add . && git ls-files --deleted | xargs --no-run-if-empty git rm

This adds all new files and removes all deleted files and stages it to the index.

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There is another way to add files. Not sure in which version this works, but at the very least it works in git 1.8.0.

$ git add -i
           staged     unstaged path
  1:    unchanged      +61/-61 a/very/long/path/that/we/really/dont/want/to/type.txt
  2:    unchanged        +1/-1 another/very/long/path/that/we/really/dont/want/to/type.txt

*** Commands ***
  1: status       2: update       3: revert       4: add untracked
  5: patch        6: diff         7: quit         8: help
What now> 2

Press 2 to select update, or type u.

           staged     unstaged path
  1:    unchanged      +61/-61 a/very/long/path/that/we/really/dont/want/to/type.txt
  2:    unchanged        +1/-1 another/very/long/path/that/we/really/dont/want/to/type.txt
Update>> 2

Press the number corresponding to the file you want to stage. Separate multiple numbers with a comma, e.g. 1,2.

           staged     unstaged path
  1:    unchanged      +61/-61 a/very/long/path/that/we/really/dont/want/to/type.txt
* 2:    unchanged        +1/-1 another/very/long/path/that/we/really/dont/want/to/type.txt
Update>>

Just press [enter] here.

updated one path

*** Commands ***
  1: status       2: update       3: revert       4: add untracked
  5: patch        6: diff         7: quit         8: help
What now> q
Bye.

Finally type 7 or q to quit.

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I believe you can just say "git add DSManger.java" if your terminal window is currently cd into the proper folder (src_test/com/abc/product/server/datasource/manager/aats). So just do:

cd src_test/com/abc/product/server/datasource/manager/aats
git add DSManger.java

Otherwise, I can't think of any other way unless you make a separate repo.

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1  
Right. That should work. But files to commit are from different packages hence it will be again tedious to everytime cd –  Vaman Kulkarni Jun 6 '11 at 7:44

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