Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Is there anyway to get indexOf like you would get in a string.

output.add("1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10);  
String bigger[] = output.get(i).split(" ");
int biggerWher = bigger.indexOf("10");

I wrote this code but its returning an error and not compiling! Any advice ?

share|improve this question
2  
Hope you have specific programming language? – CharithJ Jun 6 '11 at 8:45
    
Looks like Java to me... – aioobe Jun 6 '11 at 8:46
    
possible duplicate of Where is Java's Array indexOf? – Stephen C Jun 6 '11 at 9:20
up vote 48 down vote accepted

Use this ...

output.add("1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10");  
String bigger[] = output.get(i).split(" ");
int biggerWher = Arrays.asList(bigger).indexOf("3");
share|improve this answer
    
What are the collateral effects by using asList? Is made a copy of original array on memory? – Richard Jun 13 '14 at 17:27
    
@Richard: It will create a new ArrayList object and converts from the String array, I'd guess 3-5 times the amount of memory than before. public static <T> List<T> asList(T... array) { return new ArrayList<T>(array); } – John Dec 18 '14 at 3:38
    
not a good answer, increases overhead – Adnan Ali Dec 31 '15 at 9:14

When the array is an array of objects, then:

Object[] array = ..
Arrays.asList(array).indexOf(someObj);

Another alternative is org.apache.commons.lang.ArrayUtils.indexOf(...) which also has overloads for arrays of primitive types, as well as a 3 argument version that takes a starting offset. (The Apache version should be more efficient because they don't entail creating a temporary List instance.)

share|improve this answer
    
Why do I keep forgetting that most collection-methods apply to arrays too by using asList.... +1 – aioobe Jun 6 '11 at 9:20
    
What are the collateral effects by using asList? Is made a copy of original array on memory? – Richard Jun 13 '14 at 17:26
    
@Richard - No copy is made. The 'asList' List is a wrapper for the original array. Read the javadocs!! – Stephen C Jun 14 '14 at 1:48
    
Thank you! @StephenC – Richard Jun 15 '14 at 2:28

Arrays do not have an indexOf() method; however, java.util.List does. So you can wrap your array in a list and use the List methods (except for add() and the like):

output.add("1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10");  
String bigger[] = output.get(i).split(" ");
int biggerWhere = Arrays.asList(bigger).indexOf("10");
share|improve this answer

You can use java.util.Arrays.binarySearch(array, item); That will give you an index of the item, if any...

Please note, however, that the array needs to be sorted before searching.

Regards

share|improve this answer
output.add("1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10");

you miss a " after 10.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.