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I have a PHP file that is sometimes called from a page that has started a session and sometimes from a page that doesn't have session started. Therefore when I have session_start() on this script I sometimes get the error message for "session already started". For that I've put these lines:

if(!isset($_COOKIE["PHPSESSID"]))
{
  session_start();
}

but this time I got this warning message:

Notice: Undefined variable: _SESSION

Is there a better way to check if session has already started?

If I use @session_start will it make things work properly and just shut up the warnings?

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2  
possible duplicate of how do i check if session_start has been entered? –  Richard Harrison Jul 25 '12 at 10:17

10 Answers 10

up vote 126 down vote accepted

Recommended way for versions of PHP >= 5.4.0

if (session_status() == PHP_SESSION_NONE) {
    session_start();
}

Source: http://www.php.net/manual/en/function.session-status.php

For versions of PHP < 5.4.0

if(session_id() == '') {
    session_start();
}
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7  
I've updated the answer to be this one to keep up with the PHP version. –  Logan Aug 30 '13 at 23:52
    
Agreed, this is the recommended way for versions of PHP >= 5.4.0. –  Alex Sep 4 '13 at 16:25
1  
Please edit this answer to include both versions; it's easy to miss that this is >= 5.4.0 when only a single answer is given. –  Bobby Jack Jan 22 at 12:46
    
I think there is a problem with the solution for PHP < 5.4. session_id is set the FIRST time session is started, but it is not deleted when session is closed. So for example, if there is, before of your snippet, a code like session_start();session_write_close();: then the if condition fails but we have no open session... –  Nicolò Martini May 15 at 11:26

For versions of PHP prior to PHP 5.4.0:

if(session_id() == '') {
    // session isn't started
}

Though, IMHO, you should really think about refactoring your session management code if you don't know whether or not a session is started...

That said, my opinion is subjective, and there are situations (examples of which are described in the comments below) where it may not be possible to know if the session is started.

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28  
It's not necessarily bad to not know if your session is started. If you're lazy-loading (only starting the session when it's first needed) then the test in your answer would be perfectly fine. –  drewm Jun 6 '11 at 9:53
1  
Also in some environments apache has session autostarting set up –  LeonardChallis Sep 14 '12 at 18:32
    
An example for testing if session_id() returns empty string in an include file: –  tgoneil Oct 5 '12 at 8:05
2  
The comment about refactoring session management if you don't know if it's tarted or not is not really relevant. For example if coding advanced features into a WordPress theme you won't ever know if a plugin has already started using sessions without checking. The coding world isn't always that black and white :P –  Jimbo Jonny Nov 27 '12 at 17:23
    
Mmm, good points indeed. I do concede that my comments are very subjective - I'll amend my answer to reflect this. –  Alex Mar 8 '13 at 12:58

PHP 5.4 introduced session_status(), which is more reliable than relying on session_id().

Consider the following snippet:

session_id('test');
var_export(session_id() != ''); // true, but session is still not started!
var_export(session_status() == PHP_SESSION_ACTIVE); // false

So, to check whether a session is started, the recommended way in PHP 5.4 is now:

session_status() == PHP_SESSION_ACTIVE
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3  
A snippet of code which uses session_status when available and older methods when not would seem to be perfect here BTW, hint hint :) –  Jimbo Jonny Nov 27 '12 at 17:30
1  
Thank you for the update Benjamin. It's good to know that a new method can be used as of PHP 5.4. –  Logan Nov 28 '12 at 0:19
1  
This is a much better way of checking this, you don't always know if you have a session started especially when the user clears cookies when they are in the middle of browsing the site... I always code for 2 year old's, you never know what users are going to do ;-) As for myself I have a small Config.php file that is called on all my scripts to setup variables and other info so just adding this in that file always assures that the session is started if it is needed –  Andy Braham Jun 11 '13 at 18:03

you can do this, and it's really easy.

if (!isset($_SESSION)) session_start();

Hope it helps :)

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1  
this is the best answer –  Abdullah Aydın Apr 14 '13 at 9:48
4  
best answer?it is wrong idea.....+7 votes for incorrect answer?$_SESSION=array(); if (!isset($_SESSION)) echo 'blam'; –  zloctb Sep 25 '13 at 5:48
3  
@zloctb: I can't think of any situation in which I'd do $_SESSION=array();, so this answer seems okay. –  halfer Oct 19 '13 at 7:57
    
@halfer See Ryan's answer. If session_destroy() has been called then $_SESSION could still be set. Also, in unit tests you might set $_SESSION directly. But I upvoted this, as for most practical situations this answer should be good enough (until PHP 5.3 is never seen any more...) –  Darren Cook Mar 2 at 7:43

Prior to PHP 5.4 there is no reliable way of knowing other than setting a global flag.

Consider:

var_dump($_SESSION); // null
session_start();
var_dump($_SESSION); // array
session_destroy();
var_dump($_SESSION); // array, but session isn't active.

Or:

session_id(); // returns empty string
session_start();
session_id(); // returns session hash
session_destroy();
session_id(); // returns empty string, ok, but then
session_id('foo'); // tell php the session id to use
session_id(); // returns 'foo', but no session is active.

So, prior to PHP 5.4 you should set a global boolean. The E_NOTICE that session_start() issues was a ridiculous idea, it requires you to be omniscient, not just intimate, with any third party modules you're using that selectively use sessions. If you start sessions prior to those modules initializing you'll get an E_NOTICE when the modules invoke session_start(). The only workaround for that scenario is that modules assume the session is already started, which goes against the idea of encapsulation.

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1  
This is really good answer! –  CoR Jan 20 at 10:31

Use session_id(), it returns an empty string if not set. It's more reliable than checking the $_COOKIE.

if (strlen(session_id()) < 1) {
    session_start();
}
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You should reorganize your code so that you call session_start() exactly once per page execution.

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1  
calling it exactly once per page execution might not be desired in some situations. –  Timo Huovinen Apr 28 '12 at 13:37
    
If you're killing the session to recreate it, then sure, but that is a special case. In general, the application should have code that is ran at the very beginning once, which is where the session_start() goes. –  SamT Apr 29 '12 at 22:51
1  
for example, an application stores sessions on a file, and needs to load 2 concurrent slow requests of data, none of these requests need sessions, but one will block the other because session_start locks the session file. –  Timo Huovinen Apr 30 '12 at 10:44
    
Exactly. @YuriKolovsky is right. The Alex's question is pertinent because these cases can happen, and they are not uncommon. –  Paulocoghi May 24 '12 at 11:56
7  
-1, Most websites are CMS driven and have things such as themes and plugins, often written by different parties, never knowing if each other's code has started sessions or not. The implication that this is a code organization problem only is a false one. –  Jimbo Jonny Nov 27 '12 at 17:27

Not sure about efficiency of such solution, but this is from working project This is also used if you need to define the default language

   /**
    * Start session
    * Fall back to ukrainian language
    */
   function valid_session() {
    if(session_id()=='') {
        session_start();
        $_SESSION['lang']='uk';
        $_SESSION['lang_id']=3;
    }
    return true;
  }
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The only thing you need to do is:

<?php
if(!isset($_SESSION))
{
session_start();
}
?>
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This is the one I've used troughout the years. Anyone advicing not to use this one? Ofcourse it's good to use a check if session is started sometimes - in some environments apache has session autostarting set up, lazy-loading (only starting the session when it's first needed) or simply that one sometimes need to just make a fast hack –  Kilian Lindberg Apr 1 at 9:49

On PHP 5.3 this works for me:

if(!strlen(session_id())){
    session_name('someSpecialName');
    session_start();
} 

then you have. If you do not put the not at if statement beginning the session will start any way I do not why.

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