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Consider this small snippet of JavaScript:

for(var i in map.maps)
{
    buttons.push($("<button>").html(i).click(function() { alert(i); }));
}

It creates one button for each of the fields in the map.maps object (It's an assoc array). I set the index as the button's text and set it to alert the index as well. Obviously one would expect all the buttons to alert it's own text when clicked, but instead all the buttons alert the text of the final index in the map.maps object when clicked.

I assume this behavior is caused by the neat way JavaScript handles closures, going back and executing functions from the closures in which they were created.

The only way I can imagine getting around this is setting the index as data on the button object and using it from the click callback. I could also mimic the map.maps indices in my buttons object and find the correct index on click using indexOf, but I prefer the former method.

What I'm looking for in answers is confirmation that I'm doing it the right way, or a suggestion as to how I should do it.

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1  

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Embrace the closures, don't work around them.

for(var i in map.maps)
{
    (function(i){
        buttons.push($("<button>").html(i).click(function() { alert(i); }));
    })(i);
}

You need to wrap the code that uses your var i so that it ends up in a separate closure and the value is kept in a local var/param for that closure.

Using a separate function like in lonesomeday's answer hides this closure behaviour a little, but is at the same time much clearer.

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My code is (very slightly) faster, because the function is only created once. The effect is precisely the same, however. –  lonesomeday Jun 6 '11 at 11:23

If you pass the changing value to another function as a parameter, the value will be locked in:

function createButton(name) {
    return $("<button>").html(name).click(function() { alert(name); });
}

for (var i in map.maps) {
    buttons.push(createButton(i));
}
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for(var i in map.maps){
    (function(i){
         buttons.push($("<button>").html(i).click(function() { alert(i); }))
    })(i);
}

The cause why the closure failed in your case is that it's value still updated even after the function is bound, which is in this case is the event handler. This due to the fact that closure only remember references to variables and not the actual value when they were bound.

With executed anonymous function you can enforce the correct value, this achieved by passing i to the anonymous function, so then inside the scope of anonymous function i is defined anew.

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This is the most elegant way to do what you're trying to do:

var buttons = myCharts.map(function(chart,i) {
    return $("<button>").html(chart).click(function(event){
        alert(chart);
    });
}

You need closures to code elegantly in javascript, and shouldn't work around them. Or else you can't do things like nested for loops (without terribly hacks). When you need a closure, use a closure. Don't be afraid of defining new functions inside functions.

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