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how do we set the content type header for a page not served from a server? (i.e. a simple local file saved to desktop)

Say i have a .xml file that i would like to open as application/xml in google-chrome. how do i specify it?

Now i want to open that same file under text/xml with google-chrome is that an option?

My file:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<test></test>
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Open how? Can you show some example code? –  Pekka 웃 Jun 6 '11 at 9:03
    
@Pekka updated de question.. –  Pacerier Jun 6 '11 at 11:23
    
You're still not saying how you are planning to open the file? Using a program? Using scripting? On the operating system's shell or desktop? For what purpose? –  Pekka 웃 Jun 6 '11 at 11:27
    
@Pekka i don't get you.. i mean i'd double click it to open in my browser? –  Pacerier Jun 6 '11 at 11:38
    
@Pacerier sorry, I misread your post. I understand now. No, this is not possible - browsers will automatically interpret the content type from the file's extension. There is no way to force a different MIME type for local files. –  Pekka 웃 Jun 6 '11 at 11:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No, you can't. HTTP header exists only if it's a HTTP request or response. AFAIK, you can't set more than 1 association to a single file type in your web browser.

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Headers are only sent to and served by servers. Without a server, there is no such thing as a request, or a response, and therefore there will be no content-type header to receive.

If you are trying to keep this local, you can open it on a localhost server setup. IIS and Apache (and many others) will run on your local development box, no problem.

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no i do not mean the localhost server.. i mean the local file system. so its just impossible? –  Pacerier Jun 6 '11 at 9:33
    
That's correct. There's no server when you open it from the local file system. It's just a file. –  Jordan Jun 6 '11 at 14:10

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