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in most code examples I see people doing this.

import javax.swing.*; // for the frame
import java.awt.*; // for the checkBox and the label
import java.awt.event.*; // for the checkBox listener

If I am correct when we say import java.awt.* it imports everything inside it, so there wont be a need to say import java.awt.event.*; or is there a speed improvement? can anyone also explain what importing a library does, is it importing a simple text class to be included in the source or telling jvm to include the byte code of whatever is imported? so importing in java does nothing but switch the namespace, so I dont have to type long class names?

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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Forget the term subpackage. Do it quick. It does not exist in java world.

java.awt is a package (namespace), java.awt.event is another one and they have nothing in common. Their names share some characters, but the packages are totally unrelated. The import statements imports a class or some classes from exactly one package (namespace). If you need classes from a different package (namespace), then you have to add another import statement.


BTW, in response to a comment to another answer: You do not have to use import statements. If you don't use them, you simply have to use the fully qualified classnames in your java source file (except: classes from java.lang and the current package are imported automatically). So import could be considered as a convenient way to keep the code readable.

Importing is not required in order to use a class in your source file.

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so importing in java does nothing but switch the namespace, so I dont have to type long class names? –  dave Jun 6 '11 at 9:21
    
It's not switching namespaces. If you do import java.util.*; you can write List<Integer> list = null;, otherwise you'd have to say java.util.List<Integer> list = null;. Both statements are equivalent and compile to the same byte code. –  Andreas_D Jun 6 '11 at 9:25
    
super clear thank you very much –  dave Jun 6 '11 at 9:26
    
+1 - There's no such thing as a subpackage! –  Stephen C Jun 6 '11 at 9:33
    
@dave it isn't switching namespaces. It is opening namespaces. –  EJP Jun 6 '11 at 10:10
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The line...

import java.awt.*;

...doesn't mean that all subpackages will also be imported. You have to explicitly import every package. As an example, importing java.* doesn't give you the entire java library.

For what it's worth, I recommend importing the specific classes only unless you have good reason to use *.

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Please avoid the term subpackages. Java packages don't have any hierarchical structure. –  Andreas_D Jun 6 '11 at 9:15
    
Indeed - bad terminology. Since they are based on the filesystem I let a "subfolder" word slip in. –  Ben J Jun 6 '11 at 9:19
2  
not correct again - the standard Classloader expects *.class files at a location in the the filesystem that maps to the package name. But that's just one way, other classloaders could implement different algorithms to find classfiles - consider a classloader loading class files from a database: there wouldn't be files and folders. But the package name could be the primary key in some CLASS table. –  Andreas_D Jun 6 '11 at 9:28
    
I didn't know that, thanks. –  Ben J Jun 6 '11 at 9:38
1  
your welcome - when we learn Java we're told to store the classes according to the package name, otherwise the applications won't compile. Later we see, that this is not the full truth ;) –  Andreas_D Jun 6 '11 at 9:44
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Importing a package doesn't import its subpackages.

Importing is about switching the namespace, too.

If you only had import java.awt.* and you were to use the class java.awt.Outer.Inner, everywhere in your code you have to refer to it as Outer.Inner.

By contrast, when you say import java.awt.Outer.*, you can refer to the inner class as just Inner.

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so importing in java does nothing but switch the namespace, so I dont have to type long class names? –  dave Jun 6 '11 at 9:12
1  
Please avoid the term subpackages. Java packages don't have any hierarchical structure. –  Andreas_D Jun 6 '11 at 9:15
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Importing is just a compile time feature, in bytecode you will find only direct references to specific classes, everytime its instance is used. "import" constructs exist just to eliminate use of full class name everytime.

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Just a quick remark: please don't mix the concepts class and instance. I'd say: "[...], everytime it's used.". –  Andreas_D Jun 6 '11 at 10:43
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