Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Basically, I want to open a file, read some bytes, and then close the file. This is what I came up with:

try
{
    InputStream inputStream = new BufferedInputStream(new FileInputStream(file));
    try
    {
        // ...
        inputStream.read(buffer);
        // ...
    }
    catch (IOException e)
    {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    finally
    {
        try
        {
            inputStream.close();
        }
        catch (IOException e)
        {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}
catch (FileNotFoundException e)
{
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e.printStackTrace();
}

Maybe I'm spoiled by RAII, but there must be a better way to do this in Java, right?

share|improve this question
3  
@Vash: I can't believe I need that much boilerplate code and nested try/catch blocks to perform such a simple task. –  FredOverflow Jun 6 '11 at 9:52
3  
@Heandel, @Vash: I count 21'ish lines of code in that sample, not counting the comments. And all he wanted to do was "open file, read data, close file. If an error occurs, still close file, but also print exception info". That should be 3, maybe 4 lines of code. If you need to ask how the code could have been better, you seriously need to start learning other languages than Java. –  jalf Jun 6 '11 at 10:17
2  
@Vash: no, in some languages you do not need this many try/catch blocks for this kind of operation, and it has nothing to do with the compiler forcing you to handle exceptions. As I said before, you need to start learning some other languages. Open your eyes. Being forced to write ugly code because you're working in a crippled language is bad enough, but not even realizing that a better solution could exist is pretty much inexcusable for a programmer. –  jalf Jun 6 '11 at 11:26
1  
Guys, it is possible to write ugly code in any language, not only Java. The reason why this example is clunky is because it is written in such a way. One can even get rid of all the catch clauses by propagating the exception. Of course you can't get rid of the finally clause if you want to properly close the file. However, from my point of view this is a minor inconvenience and it will be addressed by Java 7 as I mentioned in the answer. The main reason automatic resource management is not as useful in Java as it is in C++ is due to GC. And I mostly use C++ BTW so I am not a Java advocate. –  vitaut Jun 6 '11 at 12:03
2  
@Vash: once again, no, other languages do have solutions which provide proper robust resource management without having to write a single try/catch. C++ can do it. Wanting to print out exception information might require one try/catch block, but only for the printing. Opening, reading from, and closing the file can be done with perfect error handling, without writing a single try-catch, and certainly without a finally. –  jalf Jun 6 '11 at 13:45

9 Answers 9

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If you have the same exception handling code for IOException and FileNotFoundException then you can rewrite your example in a more compact way with only one catch clause:

try {
    InputStream input = new BufferedInputStream(new FileInputStream(file));
    try {
        // ...
        input.read(buffer);
        // ...
    }
    finally {
        input.close();
    }
}
catch (IOException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}

You can even get rid of the outer try-catch if you can propagate the exception which probably makes more sense then manually printing the stack trace. If you don't catch some exception in your program you'll get stack trace printed for you automatically.

Also the need to manually close the stream will be addressed in Java 7 with automatic resource management.

With automatic resource management and exception propagation the code reduces to the following:

try (InputStream input = new BufferedInputStream(new FileInputStream(file))) {
    // ...
    input.read(buffer);
    // ...
}
share|improve this answer
4  
So in its 7th version, about 15 years after its first release, Java will finally (no pun intended) provide one of the major features of the language it was created to improve upon. I am not impressed. –  sbi Jun 6 '11 at 11:18
    
@sbi: and it's still failing to provide the same feature, instead settling for merely cutting away some of the boilerplate code. Java7's resource management is more like C#'s Using than C++'s RAII. Far better than what they have now, but still not as good as, like you said, the major feature of the language it was intended to improve upon. –  jalf Jun 6 '11 at 11:29
1  
Oh, no! My answer is being hijacked by C++ advocates. =) –  vitaut Jun 6 '11 at 11:37
1  
Yeah. It's funny. The question could be closed for questions of this type [...] usually lead to confrontation and argument. Of course it won't because it highlights a valid point. Just saying... –  musiKk Jun 6 '11 at 11:45
1  
@JavaDeveloper If FileInputStream ctor throws an exception it should free resources and BufferedInputStream doesn't throw anything (see docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/io/…). So it shouldn't leak resources. –  vitaut Mar 12 at 3:49

Usually these methods are wrapped up in libraries. Unless you want to write at this level, it is best to create your own helper methods or use existing ones like FileUtils.

String fileAsString = Fileutils.readFileToString(filename);
// OR
for(String line: FileUtils.readLines(filename)) {
    // do something with each line.
}
share|improve this answer

I don't know if it is the right way, but you can have all your code in the same try block, and then have the different catch blocks right after each other.

try {
  ...
}
catch (SomeException e) {
  ...
}
catch (OtherException e) {
  ...
}
share|improve this answer

If you want to do this in plain Java, the code you have posted looks OK.

You could use 3rd party libraries such as Commons IO, in which you would need to write much less code. e.g.

Check out Commons IO at:

http://commons.apache.org/io/description.html

share|improve this answer

Sometimes you can reduce the code to the following:

public void foo(String name) throws IOException {
    InputStream in = null;
    try {
        in = new FileInputStream(name);
        in.read();
        // whatever
    } finally {
        if(in != null) {
            in.close();
        }
    }
}

Of course this means the caller of foo has to handle the IOException but this should be the case most of the time anyway. In the end you don't really reduce all that much complexity but the code becomes much more readable due to less nested exception handlers.

share|improve this answer

My take on this without using utilities would be:

InputStream inputStream = null;
try {
    inputStream = new BufferedInputStream(new FileInputStream(file));
    // ...
    inputStream.read(buffer);
    // ...
} catch (IOException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
    throw e; // Rethrow if you cannot handle the exception
} finally {
    if (inputStream != null) {
        inputStream.close();
    }
}

Not a one-liner, but not pretty bad. Using, say, Apache Commons IO it would be:

//...
buffer = FileUtils.readFileToByteArray(file);
//...

The thing to rembember is that standard Java lacks many of these little utilities and easy to use interfaces that everyone needs, so you have to rely on some support libraries like Apache Commons, Google Guava, ... in your projects, (or implement your own utility classes).

share|improve this answer

Use org.apache.commons.io.FileUtils.readFileToByteArray(File) or something similar from that package. It still throws IOException but it deals with cleaning up for you.

share|improve this answer

Try the following:

try
{
    InputStream inputStream = new BufferedInputStream(new FileInputStream(file));
    byte[] buffer = new byte[1024];
    try
    {
        // ...
        int bytesRead = 0;
        while ((bytesRead = inputStream.read(buffer)) != -1) {                
           //Process the chunk of bytes read
        }
    }
    catch (IOException e)
    {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    finally
    {           
        inputStream.close();
    }
}
catch (FileNotFoundException e)
{
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e.printStackTrace();
}
share|improve this answer

Google guava has tried to address this problem by introducing Closeables.

Otherwise you have to wait until AutoCloseable from JDK 7 comes out as it addresses some of the cases when IOException is thrown.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.