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The following code sample:

interface I<out T>
    where T : class, I<T>
{
    T GetT();
}

interface J : I<J>
{
}

abstract class B<T> : I<T>
    where T : B<T>
{
    T I<T>.GetT()
    {
        return null;
    }
}

class C : B<C>, J
{
}

fails to compile (under VS2010 with SP1) with the following error:

Error   4   'C' does not implement interface member 'I<J>.GetT()'

However, C does implement (through its base B<C>) I<C>, which, due to I being declared covariant, should capture I<J> as well (as C : J).

Is this a compiler bug? If not, why am I not allowed to do that?

share|improve this question
2  
I suspect it may be due to explicit interface implementation. Have you tried making B<T>.GetT() just public? –  Jon Skeet Jun 6 '11 at 10:29
    
Yes, I have. The error remains, with the added comment that B's implementation has invalid return type to be a match (we don't have return type covariance). –  Grzegorz Herman Jun 6 '11 at 10:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Even though it is covariant, you cannot change the return type of the interface. This is no different from the covariance in non-Generic classes.

interface Animal
{
    Animal GetAnimal();
}

class Cat : Animal
{
   //Not ALlowed
   Cat GetAnimal()
   {
       return this;
   }

   //Allowed
   Animal GetAnimal()
   {
       return this;
   }   
}

The problem is that C as a specialization of B<C> returns C I<C>.GetT(), however the specification of J requires J GetT().

Try the following:

interface I<out T>
    where T : class, I<T>
{
    T GetT();
}

interface J : I<J>
{
}

abstract class B<T,U> : I<U>
    where T : B<T,U>, U
    where U : class, I<U>
{
    U I<U>.GetT()
    {
        return null;
    }
}

class C : B<C,J>, J
{
}
share|improve this answer
    
It seems then that variance is only useful "from the outside" - here I<C> is only convertible to I<J>, an implementation of the former is not an implementation of the latter. Am I correct? –  Grzegorz Herman Jun 8 '11 at 12:02
    
@Grzegorz, you are asking another question. The reason the code doesn't compile has nothing to do with covariance, it has to do with the fact that CLR languages do not allow you to modify the signature of an interface method in an implementation - even if it is a constraint. Personally, I find the covariant feature for generics to be mostly useful when dealing with Generic collections. i.e. IList<B> bList = new IList<C>(){}; (where C : B). –  Ethan Cabiac Jun 8 '11 at 12:35
    
@Ethan: This compiles correctly: interface I<out T> { T GetT(); } class A { } class B : A { } class C : I<B> { B I<B>.GetT() { return null; } static void M() { I<A> ia = new C(); } }. Here, the implementation of I<B> serves (automatically) as an implementation of I<A>, even though the return types of GetT are different. It is not clear (at least to me) why it should not work in the original case. And, by the way, IIRC IList is not covariant... –  Grzegorz Herman Jun 8 '11 at 13:27
    
Moreover, if I add I<A> next to I<B>, the code fails to compile - even though the compiler was perfectly happy to treat an object of class C as I<A> until I explicitly said it is one! –  Grzegorz Herman Jun 8 '11 at 13:33
    
It does not seem to be a compiler issue - mono-2.10.2 behaves exactly like VS on all of the above examples. –  Grzegorz Herman Jun 8 '11 at 13:36

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