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I'm still relatively new to javascript and jQuery and was just wondering this.

Suppose I have this HTML snippet:

<p id="disclaimer">
Disclaimer! </p>
<input type="button" id="hideButton" value="hide" />

I could hide the div in the following ways:

$(document).ready(function() {
    $('#hideButton').click(function() {
        if ($('#disclaimer').css('display') == 'none') {
            $('#disclaimer').show();
            $('#hideButton').val('hide');
        } else {
            $('#disclaimer').hide();
            $('#hideButton').val('unhide');         
        }
    })
});

OR

$(document).ready(function() {
$('#hideButton').click(function() {
    if ($('#disclaimer').is(':visible')) {
        $('#disclaimer').hide();
        $('#hideButton').val('unhide'); 
    } else {
        $('#disclaimer').show();
        $('#hideButton').val('hide');
    }
    })
});

My question is: Is there a preferred method of hiding the div or is it just a matter of personal preference?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

i'd write that like this

$(function() {
    $('#hideButton').click(function() {
        $('#disclaimer').toggle();
        $(this).val(
            $('#disclaimer').is(":visible") ? 
                'hide' : 'unhide'
        );
    })
})

or even

$(function() {
    $('#hideButton').click(function() {
        $(this).val(
            $('#disclaimer').toggle().is(":visible") ? 
                'hide' : 'unhide'
        )
    })
})

in response to the comment, here some points why i think this code is better

  • $(...) looks nicer than document.ready
  • toggle() without a param is better than "if is visible then hide else show" - don't ask, tell.
  • always use $(this) to refer to the object itself in an event handler
  • use chaining when it doesn't hurt readability
share|improve this answer
    
I like the last one - this is how jQuery chaining was meant to be utilized. –  Tomas Lycken Jun 6 '11 at 10:43
    
Ok so there are at least 4 different ways to hide a div. I'm not sure if that's helping me understand which one to use lol –  super9 Jun 6 '11 at 10:43
    
Your 'or even' code makes no sense (what's the purpose of the ternary operator and strings, 'hide' and 'unhide'?) Also, it might be worth "caching" elements, instead of re-querying DOM for '#disclaimer' (twice) every time the button is clicked. –  James Jun 6 '11 at 10:45
    
@stereofrog thank you for explaining. –  super9 Jun 6 '11 at 10:51

Yes, you could use the .toggle(showOrHide) variant:

$(document).ready(function() {
    $('#hideButton').click(function() {
        var $disclaimer = $('#disclaimer'),
            isVisible = $disclaimer.is(':visible');

        $disclaimer.toggle(!isVisible);
        $('#hideButton').val(isVisible ? 'unhide' : 'hide'); 
    });
});
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There is no point in querying the element's style to find out if it's visible; you can retain its state programmatically:

var isVisible = true,
    disclaimer = $('#disclaimer'),
    hideButton = $('#hideButton');

hideButton.click(function(){
    disclaimer[isVisible ? 'hide' : 'show']();
    hideButton.val(isVisible ? 'unhide' : 'hide');
    isVisible = !isVisible;
});
share|improve this answer

I would do the actual hiding exactly like user187291 wrote.

But for your questions, I would suggest using the ":visible" selector since there are more ways to hide an element other than changing its display css attribute. From the jQuery specification:

Elements can be considered hidden for several reasons:

    * They have a CSS display value of none.
    * They are form elements with type="hidden".
    * Their width and height are explicitly set to 0.
    * An ancestor element is hidden, so the element is not shown on

the page.

A certain animation may reach the state of having the width and height set explicitly to 0 and not change the display attribute.

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