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In my user interface I have a slider which gives values at range 0 .. 100.

I have variable foo, which I want to have values between 0.2 ... 5.0 so that when the slider value is 50, variable foo gets value 1.0 and when the slider value is 0 foo gets value 0.2 and when slider value is 100 foo gets value 5.0. And all the between numbers I want to work accordingly so that slider value 25 gives foo value 0.6 and slider value 75 gives foo value 2.5. etc.

I want it to work like this as I am using it as a factor. When the slider is 100, the factor is 5 and makes the target value 5 times higher the original value and when the slider is 0 the factor is 0.2 and thus makes the target value 5 times lower than the original value. And when the slider is 50, it just multiplies original value with 1.0 making no changes to the value.

I guess there's some simple mathematical way to do this?

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closed as not a real question by Neil Butterworth, CharlesB, Bo Persson, Daniel Daranas, bmargulies Jun 6 '11 at 12:53

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
It looks like you want an exponential scale. If your slider value is x, your factor is (5^((x-50)/50). –  n.m. Jun 6 '11 at 12:18
    
"And all the between numbers I want to work accordingly" is not a proper way to specify the behaviour of your software. –  Daniel Daranas Jun 6 '11 at 12:22
    
works! big thanks! –  bittersoon Jun 6 '11 at 12:22
    
@n.m. you might want to post this as an answer. –  Jesse Emond Jun 6 '11 at 12:35

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