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In order to have custom button captions in an input dialog, I created the following code:

String key = null;
JTextField txtKey = new JTextField();        
int answerKey = JOptionPane.showOptionDialog(this, new Object[] {pleaseEnterTheKey, txtKey}, decryptionKey, JOptionPane.OK_CANCEL_OPTION, JOptionPane.QUESTION_MESSAGE, null, new Object[] {okCaption, cancelCaption}, okCaption);        
if (answerKey == JOptionPane.OK_OPTION && txtKey.getText() != null) {
  key = txtKey.getText();
}

How can I move the focus (cursor) to the text field as the dialog is displayed?

UPDATE

This does not work for me, I mean the textfield has no focus: OS: Fedora - Gnome

public class Test {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    String key = null;
    JTextField txtKey = new JTextField();
    txtKey.addAncestorListener(new RequestFocusListener());
    int answerKey = JOptionPane.showOptionDialog(null, new Object[]{"Please enter the key:", txtKey}, "Title", JOptionPane.OK_CANCEL_OPTION, JOptionPane.QUESTION_MESSAGE, null, new Object[]{"OKKK", "CANCELLLL"}, "OKKK");
    if (answerKey == JOptionPane.OK_OPTION && txtKey.getText() != null) {
      key = txtKey.getText();
    }
  }
}
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1  
@ehsun7b, and what's the question? –  mre Jun 6 '11 at 12:01
    
@mre, How can I move the cursor to the text field? –  ehsun7b Jun 6 '11 at 12:06
    
@ehsun7b, try txtKey.requestFocusInWindow(); - download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/awt/… –  mre Jun 6 '11 at 12:10
    
@mre: That does not seem to work in my simple tests. I'm sure I've seen the 'one-line' answer to this, but for the life of me I cannot recall it. –  Andrew Thompson Jun 6 '11 at 12:16
    
@mre: It doesn't work! :( –  ehsun7b Jun 6 '11 at 12:17

6 Answers 6

Dialog Focus shows how you can easily set the focus on any component in a modal dialog.

share|improve this answer
    
Very nice article but unfortunately it won't help me since the requestFocus for the default button will occur after gaining the focus by the TextField using AncestorListener. :( –  ehsun7b Jun 6 '11 at 19:58
1  
@ehsun7b, Works fine for my using JDK6_7 on XP. Post your SSCCE (sscce.org) that demonstrates your problem. The code you posted is not a SSCCE since we don't know what the value of all your varialbes is and it doesn't compile and there is no main() method. –  camickr Jun 6 '11 at 20:33
    
Check my question update please. –  ehsun7b Jun 7 '11 at 17:35
2  
@ehsun7b, Your posted code works for me so maybe their is a difference in event processing between the two systems. Did you add any output to make sure the event listener is invoked? If you read the blog, someone suggested that an HierarchyListener can also be used. Try that to see what happens. Or another option is to wrap the code from the AncestorListener in a SwingUtltities.invokeLater(). This will add the code to the end of the EDT so that is hopefully executes after focus has been placed on the button. –  camickr Jun 8 '11 at 0:34

passing null as the last argument is the solution. At least it worked for me.

String key = null;
JTextField txtKey = new JTextField();        
int answerKey = JOptionPane.showOptionDialog(this, new Object[] {pleaseEnterTheKey, txtKey}, decryptionKey, JOptionPane.OK_CANCEL_OPTION, JOptionPane.QUESTION_MESSAGE, null, new Object[] {okCaption, cancelCaption}, null);        
if (answerKey == JOptionPane.OK_OPTION && txtKey.getText() != null) {
  key = txtKey.getText();
}

But even this solution bring another problem:

Focused component and Default component are different. Default component or default button is the button which its onclick fires if you press ENTER KEY.The last argument define the default component which gets the focus too and passing null brings the problem of having no default component! I solved it for my code this way but I guess it is not a best practice:

String key = null;
    final JTextField txtKey = new JTextField();
    txtKey.addKeyListener(new KeyAdapter() {

      @Override
      public void keyPressed(KeyEvent e) {
        int keyCode = e.getKeyCode();
        if (keyCode == 10) { //enter key
          Container parent = txtKey.getParent();              
          while (!(parent instanceof JOptionPane)) {
            parent = parent.getParent();
          }

          JOptionPane pane = (JOptionPane) parent;
          final JPanel pnlBottom = (JPanel) pane.getComponent(pane.getComponentCount() - 1);
          for (int i = 0; i < pnlBottom.getComponents().length; i++) {
            Component component = pnlBottom.getComponents()[i];
            if (component instanceof JButton) {
              final JButton okButton = ((JButton)component);
              if (okButton.getText().equalsIgnoreCase(okCaption)) {
                ActionListener[] actionListeners = okButton.getActionListeners();
                if (actionListeners.length > 0) {
                  actionListeners[0].actionPerformed(null);
                }
              }
            }
          }
        }
      }

    });
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I had the same problem with the RequestFocusListener() not working on Linux, after following the discussion on http://bugs.sun.com/bugdatabase/view_bug.do?bug_id=5018574 I found that adding an invokeLater fixed it for now...

public class RequestFocusListener implements AncestorListener
{
public void ancestorAdded(final AncestorEvent e)
{
    final AncestorListener al= this;   
    SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable(){

        @Override
        public void run() {
            JComponent component = (JComponent)e.getComponent();
            component.requestFocusInWindow();
            component.removeAncestorListener( al );
        }
    });
}

public void ancestorMoved(AncestorEvent e) {}
public void ancestorRemoved(AncestorEvent e) {}
}
share|improve this answer
    
then look here stackoverflow.com/questions/6680068/… –  mKorbel Jul 14 '11 at 8:01
    
yea this applies to that solution too –  Jim Morris Jul 14 '11 at 8:38

Try this

String key = null;
JTextField txtKey = new JTextField();
Object[] foo = {pleaseEnterTheKey, txtKey};      
int answerKey = JOptionPane.showOptionDialog(this, foo, decryptionKey, JOptionPane.OK_CANCEL_OPTION, JOptionPane.QUESTION_MESSAGE, null, new Object[] {okCaption, cancelCaption}, foo[1]);        
if (answerKey == JOptionPane.OK_OPTION && txtKey.getText() != null) {
  key = txtKey.getText();
}
share|improve this answer
    
I guess the first solution is suits me since I need to have a textfield and let the user to type his/her input as text. –  ehsun7b Jun 6 '11 at 13:08
    
@ehsun7b, the second solution is suitable for you as well. with respect to the code snippet I included, just include txtKey as an item of options, and then point to it in the final argument options[indexOfTextField]. I've tested it, and it works just fine. –  mre Jun 6 '11 at 13:12
    
The componentShown never execute! –  ehsun7b Jun 6 '11 at 13:13
    
@ehsun7b, it should, otherwise you wouldn't see txtKey in the display. anyway, I'd recommend you go with the second option I presented you with. it's been tested and verified. –  mre Jun 6 '11 at 13:14
    
@mre: I have tried the second solution before, the problem with that is: It shows the textfield besides the buttons, not in the middle of the dialog. :) –  ehsun7b Jun 6 '11 at 13:14
    public static String getPassword(String title) {
        JPanel panel = new JPanel();
        final JPasswordField passwordField = new JPasswordField(10);
        panel.add(new JLabel("Password"));
        panel.add(passwordField);
        JOptionPane pane = new JOptionPane(panel, JOptionPane.QUESTION_MESSAGE, JOptionPane.OK_CANCEL_OPTION) {
            @Override
            public void selectInitialValue() {
                passwordField.requestFocusInWindow();
            }
        };
        pane.createDialog(null, title).setVisible(true);
        return passwordField.getPassword().length == 0 ? null : new String(passwordField.getPassword());
}
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The trick is to (a) use an AncestorListener on the text component to request focus, and when the focus is lost again (given to the default button), ask for focus a second time using a FocusListener on the text component (but don't keep asking for focus after that):

final JPasswordField accessPassword = new JPasswordField();

accessPassword.addAncestorListener( new AncestorListener()
{
  @Override
  public void ancestorRemoved( final AncestorEvent event )
  {
  }
  @Override
  public void ancestorMoved( final AncestorEvent event )
  {
  }
  @Override
  public void ancestorAdded( final AncestorEvent event )
  {
    // Ask for focus (we'll lose it again)
    accessPassword.requestFocusInWindow();
  }
} );

accessPassword.addFocusListener( new FocusListener()
{
  @Override
  public void focusGained( final FocusEvent e )
  {
  }
  @Override
  public void focusLost( final FocusEvent e )
  {
    if( isFirstTime )
    {
      // When we lose focus, ask for it back but only once
      accessPassword.requestFocusInWindow();
      isFirstTime = false;
    }
  }
  private boolean isFirstTime = true;
} );
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