Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Suppose I have the following:

a = [1,2,3,1,2,1,1,1,3,2,2,1]

How to find the most frequent number in this list in a neat way?

Regards

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 36 down vote accepted

If your list contains all non-negative ints, you should take a look at numpy.bincounts:

http://docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy/reference/generated/numpy.bincount.html

and then probably use np.argmax:

a = np.array([1,2,3,1,2,1,1,1,3,2,2,1])
counts = np.bincount(a)
print np.argmax(counts)

For a more complicated list (that perhaps contains negative numbers or non-integer values), you can use np.histogram in a similar way. Alternatively, if you just want to work in python without using numpy, collections.Counter is a good way of handling this sort of data.

from collections import Counter
a = [1,2,3,1,2,1,1,1,3,2,2,1]
b = Counter(a)
print b.most_common(1)
share|improve this answer
12  
+1. Could be just np.bincount([1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 1, 1, 1, 3, 2, 2, 1]).argmax() –  Nikolai N Fetissov Jun 6 '11 at 13:09
    
+1. This is at least an order of magnitude faster than scipy.stats.mode, although less general. –  larsmans Jun 6 '11 at 13:14
    
I'd like to give you another +1; I didn't know about this function, but just put to good use this afternoon! –  larsmans Jun 6 '11 at 17:55
    
Nice answer! However, if someone is on python 2.6, collections.Counter is not available. In that case, see my answer below. –  JJC Jul 1 '13 at 17:00

If you're willing to use SciPy:

>>> from scipy.stats import mode
>>> mode([1,2,3,1,2,1,1,1,3,2,2,1])
(array([ 1.]), array([ 6.]))
>>> most_frequent = mode([1,2,3,1,2,1,1,1,3,2,2,1])[0][0]
>>> most_frequent
1.0
share|improve this answer

While most of the answers above are useful, in case you: 1) need it to support non-positive-integer values (e.g. floats or negative integers ;-)), and 2) aren't on Python 2.7 (which collections.Counter requires), and 3) prefer not to add the dependency of scipy (or even numpy) to your code, then a purely python 2.6 solution that is O(nlogn) is:

from collections import defaultdict

a = [1,2,3,1,2,1,1,1,3,2,2,1]

d = defaultdict(int)
for i in a:
  d[i] += 1
most_frequent = sorted(d.iteritems(), key=lambda x: x[1], reverse=True)[0]
share|improve this answer

Also if you want to get most frequent value(positive or negative) without loading any modules you can use the following code:

lVals = [1,2,3,1,2,1,1,1,3,2,2,1]
print max(map(lambda val: (lVals.count(val), val), set(lVals)))
share|improve this answer
    
This is from a while ago, but for posterity: this is equivalent to the easier-to-read max(set(lVals), key=lVals.count), which does an O(n) count for each unique element of lVals for approximately O(n^2) (assuming O(n) unique elements). Using collections.Counter(lVals).most_common(1)[0][0] from the standard library, as suggested by JoshAdel, is only O(n). –  Dougal Aug 14 '12 at 16:46

I'm recently doing a project and using collections.Counter.(Which tortured me).

The Counter in collections have a very very bad performance in my opinion. It's just a class wrapping dict().

What's worse, If you use cProfile to profile its method, you should see a lot of '__missing__' and '__instancecheck__' stuff wasting the whole time.

Be careful using its most_common(), because everytime it would invoke a sort which makes it extremely slow. and if you use most_common(x), it will invoke a heap sort, which is also slow.

Btw, numpy's bincount also have a problem: if you use np.bincount([1,2,4000000]), you will get an array with 4000000 elements.

share|improve this answer
1  
A dict is the most finely-tuned data structure in Python and is ideal for counting arbitrary objects. In contrast, binning only works on numerical values and doesn't let you prevent aliasing between closely spaced discrete values. In the case of Counter, the __missing__ method is only called when an element is first seen; otherwise, its presence is cost-free. Note, the most_common() method is blazingly fast in most cases because the heap is very small compared to the total dataset. In most cases, the most_common() method makes only slightly more comparisons than min(). –  Raymond Hettinger Mar 31 '13 at 21:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.