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I'm wondered is it possible to debug .net embedded js files in WebStorm? Because, actually, breakpoints in the real file doesn't work. And .NET WebApplication sends it's own (zipped) content with no references to original file.

How I can debug js in that case, using WebStorm debugger?

UPDATE (for better understanding of the problem). So I have file called, for example, dialog.js. I set the property "Embedded" for this file in .net project config. I've added assembly declaration for this file. So it behaves like .net assembly. Then I added that assembly with ScriptManager to queue, loaded on a client startup. And in that stage - this file is loaded with the url like *http://site/ScriptResource.axd?d=AC9roCTnD0FDFmh4thoy3kzImrN7wKp9_WVOFcPes0Zzhg1&t=2aaf8bd5/eval/seq/70*. And I'm not able to debug this file with WebStorm - it reasonably says that cannot connect to the file dialog.js. Maybe I need to specify/change the naming rules (or rewrite url) of the url for my embedded files?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use a browser debugger and debug client-side. Chrome and IE9 come with a good one one built-in, and Firefox has a decent one available as a plugin.

Yes. I'm pretty experienced with Firebug... But when I met WebStorm IDE, I felt in love. So I want to use JetBrains' debugger, not built-in one. Also I have experience with GWT technology and JetBrains' debugger was very cool (much more better then others). So my intention is to use WebStorm to debug javascript. – ajukraine

Ok, granted I don't use WebStorm, but from a glance at its abilities it looks like the WebStorm JS debugger is really for pure HTML/JS programs, not server-side code. That said, there's this little feature that allows you to debug applications directly in Firefox. The example points toward a file, but I would be surprised if it didn't accept a URL as well. Try pointing that toward your server-side .NET application, and you should be able to debug the JS file in question.

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Yes. I'm pretty experienced with Firebug... But when I met WebStorm IDE, I felt in love. So I want to use JetBrains' debugger, not built-in one. Also I have experience with GWT technology and JetBrains' debugger was very cool (much more better then others). So my intention is to use WebStorm to debug javascript. –  ajukraine Jun 6 '11 at 14:28
    
@ajukraine .NET files and WebStorm don't go well together. To debug .NET use visual studio. –  Raynos Jun 6 '11 at 14:39
    
@Raynos You're right. But it's not the point of .NET, it's plain JavaScript file, that should be debugged. Maybe someone has experience in that... –  ajukraine Jun 6 '11 at 14:43
    
@ajukraine: I responded with an answer edit. –  Randolpho Jun 6 '11 at 14:50
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@ajukraine: Well, you could always just export the JS file and load it into your IDE. It will execute the same either way -- it's not like .NET is in the habit of building dynamic .JS files. Keep in mind that it is still likely to be targeted at whatever markup is generated by the server-side page it supports, so you'll probably need to know a bit more than just the .JS file for comfort. –  Randolpho Jun 6 '11 at 15:31

I figured it out, you don't need to worry about what the underlying web server is (apache, iis, whatever), and you can even debug remote http urls. All you do is setup the debug config in webstorm to point to the url you are testing for the "path" attribute in the edit configuration.

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