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[ASP.NET 4.0 / EF 4.1]

Hi,

I´m trying to use "Linq Methods" to filter a datasource based on datetime fields, but I´m getting the error: "Only primitive types ('such as Int32, String, and Guid') are supported in this context".

I know that Entity Framework have some limitations when dealing with dates, but what I need is some elegant solution to deal with this issue.

My code is:

    public IList<Order> GetOrders(int? orderId = null, string customerId = null, int? employeeId = null, DateTime? orderDateFrom = null, DateTime? orderDateUntil=null, DateTime? requiredDate = null, DateTime? shippedDate = null)
    {
        IQueryable<Order> result;

        result = from order in ctx.Orders.Include("Order_Details")
                 select order;

        // Apply filters to the base query
        if (orderId != null)
            result = result.Where(o => o.OrderID.Equals(orderId));

        if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(customerId))
            result = result.Where(o => o.CustomerID.ToUpper().Equals(customerId.ToUpper()));

        if (employeeId != null)
            result = result.Where(o => o.EmployeeID.Equals(employeeId));

        if (orderDateFrom != null)
            result = result.Where(o => o.OrderDate >= orderDateFrom);

        if (orderDateUntil != null)
            result = result.Where(o => o.OrderDate <= orderDateUntil);

        if (requiredDate != null)
            result = result.Where(o => o.RequiredDate == requiredDate);

        if (shippedDate != null)
            result = result.Where(o => o.ShippedDate == shippedDate);

        return result.ToList();
    }

When the code executes the query (result.ToList()) it throws the exception. If I remove the datetime .Where clauses, it works fine.

Thanks!

Solution

I have changed my code to:

    public IList<Order> GetOrders(int? orderId = null, string customerId = null, int? employeeId = null, DateTime? orderDateFrom = null, DateTime? orderDateUntil=null, DateTime? requiredDate = null, DateTime? shippedDate = null)
    {
        IQueryable<Order> result;

        result = from order in ctx.Orders.Include("Order_Details")
                 select order;

        // Apply filters to the base query
        if (orderId != null)
            result = result.Where(o => o.OrderID.Equals(orderId.Value));

        if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(customerId))
            result = result.Where(o => o.CustomerID.ToUpper() == customerId.ToUpper());

        if (employeeId != null)
            result = result.Where(o => o.EmployeeID == employeeId.Value);

        if (orderDateFrom != null)
            result = result.Where(o => o.OrderDate >= orderDateFrom.Value);

        if (orderDateUntil != null)
            result = result.Where(o => o.OrderDate <= orderDateUntil.Value);

        if (requiredDate != null)
            result = result.Where(o => o.RequiredDate == requiredDate.Value);

        if (shippedDate != null)
            result = result.Where(o => o.ShippedDate == shippedDate.Value);

        return result.ToList();
    }

If someone has a better solution, please let me know.

share|improve this question
    
Huh, must be a 4.1 issue because 4.0 supports dates in this fashion; we have date checking just like yours and it works fine. Are you using code first? – Brian Mains Jun 6 '11 at 15:08
    
I can't remember, does DateTime.Compare(t1, t2) work in EF linq queries? – FlyingStreudel Jun 6 '11 at 15:10
    
Comparing DateTimes as in the code above also works in EF 4.1. It's strange. Do you use SQL Server? Or SQL Server CE version? Or some other DB? – Slauma Jun 6 '11 at 15:13
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You're using a nullable type DateTime? in your example. I'm not sure if your database column allows NULL, but I'd use date.Value to pass the value of the parameter to be sure EF doesn't fall over it. Note that with nullable types, you can als use the HasValue property to check if your parameter contains a proper value. This results in:

if (orderDateFrom.HasValue)
   result = result.Where(o => o.OrderDate >= orderDateFrom.Value);
share|improve this answer
    
This looks cleaner, true. But comparison with a nullable type actually works, also in LINQ to Entities. I just tested all 4 combinations (OrderDate and orderDateFrom nullable or not) and it always worked in my example, I never had to use .Value. – Slauma Jun 6 '11 at 17:07
    
Thanks @Bart. It was really my fault, because I cannot use expressions like result = result.Where(o => o.OrderID.Equals(orderId)). I must use the expression result = result.Where(o=>Equals(orderId.Value)). So as far as I understant, the problem relates not only to DateTime (see OrderID), but comparisons with referenceType. – outlookrperson Jun 6 '11 at 17:16
    
@Slauma, could you provide some code excerpt that demonstrates your affirmation? Tks. – outlookrperson Jun 6 '11 at 17:41
    
@rperson: I see now, I also get indeed your exception when I use Equals with a nullable type. Are you sure that this wasn't your only problem? Do you really also get the exception when you remove now .Value from your DateTime filters? (My example is really exactly like one of your DateTime Where-clauses, just with other class and property names.) – Slauma Jun 6 '11 at 17:55

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