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I want to read a file on my local machine that contains query parameters when I execute a query in Oracle SQL developer. The examples that I've found on the web so far are inadequate. I keep getting "ORA-29283: invalid file operation" errors when I execute the below code:

CREATE DIRECTORY SAMPLEDATA2 AS 'C:';
GRANT READ, WRITE ON DIRECTORY SAMPLEDATA2 TO PUBLIC;


declare
f utl_file.file_type;
s varchar2(200);
c number := 0;

BEGIN

f := utl_file.fopen('SAMPLEDATA2','sample2.txt','R');
loop
    utl_file.get_line(f,s);
    dbms_output.put_line(s);
    c := c + 1;
end loop;

exception
    when NO_DATA_FOUND then
        utl_file.fclose(f);
        dbms_output.put_line('Number of lines: ' || c);
end;
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possible duplicate of UTL_FILE.FOPEN() procedure not accepting path for directory ? –  APC Jun 6 '11 at 18:27

2 Answers 2

UTL_FILE can only read data from files that are stored on the database server. Since it is PL/SQL code, it runs on the database server and only has access to the resources that are available to the Oracle process on the database server.

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O.K., that's why that's failing, thanks. Is there an alternative that I can use to read a local file and send it to the database? –  user786149 Jun 6 '11 at 16:54
1  
@user786149 - Not really. You could do something like use SQLLoader to write the file to a CLOB column in a table in the database and then use the DBMS_LOB package to read the data from the CLOB. But that would be quite different semantics. You would generally be better off copying the file to the database server and using UTL_FILE to read the file (assuming, of course, that you wouldn't be better off using SQLLoader to just load the data from the file into a table). –  Justin Cave Jun 6 '11 at 17:14

"I want to read a file on my local machine that contains query parameters when I execute a query in Oracle SQL developer."

This seems an unusual - I was going to say 'peculiar' -architectural decision. Where do these values comne from? Why do thay have to be stored in a file? How often do they change?

It is going to be very difficult to expose the contents of a local PC file to a remote database server (i.e. we're talking automating it with ftp or a manual process involving something like WinSCP).

On the other hand, it could be quite simple to apply some query parameters to a query; for instance by using SYS_CONTEXT and namespaces. But I need to know more details before I can provide an alternative solution.

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It's a one time data migration procedure that involve a dozen different tables and around 1500 distinct dates that are not consecutive. I have all the information in a flat file so I thought it would be simplest to read that flat file as input to the migration scripts. –  user786149 Jun 6 '11 at 19:51
    
Well, heck, if it's a one-time load, screw elegance and turn your data into a script of a bunch of insert statements and toss it all into a temp table for further massaging later. (I do this in Excel personally.) –  Mark Bowytz Jun 11 '11 at 19:40

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