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In trying to patch memory leaks among other things in a side project I've totally confused myself with pointers and lists and maps and memory, etc.

I want to create a list of objects to use throughout the programs life. But I also want to use a map to quickly access individual objects from that list through their unique id. I figured I could have a map of pointers to the objects in the list to cut down on memory size.

Is this possible?

I've been working on test code that looks like:

list<cObject> mylist;
map<int, ciEntity*> mymap;

void main(void)
{
    int x = 0;
    class cObject *temp;

    for(x = 0; x < 10; x++)
    {
        temp = new cObject;
        temp->name = new char[25];
        strcpy(temp->name, "Test");
        temp->id=x;
        mylist.push_back(*temp);
        // now what with the map?
        delete temp;
    }

}  

I've had other ideas too messing around with the map declaration. I've tried using an iter to go through the list and then mymap[id]=iter or similar variations. I've had zero luck getting anything to work. I know my fundamentals aren't where they should be in regards to working with memory. Any help is appreciated!

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Please add some more info on the cObject and ciEntity classes to allow a better answer... –  S.C. Madsen Jun 6 '11 at 15:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I would alter this a little bit, and use something like a std::shared_ptr<cObject> in both your list and your map. You can, for the map, use either an int, or possibly a std::string for the key-type, and then for the value-type, use the std::shared_ptr<cObject>

So your code would look more like:

using namespace std;

list<shared_ptr<cObject> > mylist;
map<int, shared_ptr<cObject> > mymap;

void main(void)
{
    int x = 0;

    for(x = 0; x < 10; x++)
    {
        std::shared_ptr<cObject> temp = shared_ptr(new cObject);
        temp->name = new char[25];
        strcpy(temp->name, "Test");
        temp->id=x;
        mylist.push_back(temp);

        // now what with the map?
        mymap[x] = temp;

        //no need to delete temp since it's a managed pointer-type
    }

}

If for some reason your compiler doesn't have std::shared_ptr, you can also get it from boost.

The nice thing with this approach is that your list and map are now pointing to the same object, so if you change the object in the list, the changes will also be reflected in the map. Also the shared_ptr object will manage the life-time of the pointer through reference counting, so once there are no more references to the pointer, it will call delete on the pointer without you having to worry about cleaning up the pointers from each container (and avoiding ownership issues of the pointers as well).

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Agreed. Any attempt to create a pointer to an object in the list will actually point to the specific item in the vector at that location. If the item changes position in the vector, or if the vector reallocates its internal storage (if it needs to grow after a push_back) the pointer would become invalid. Storing a pointer in both the vector and map is the only option if you don't want to put extra copies in the map. –  Sven Jun 6 '11 at 15:38
    
+1 for introducing C++0x smart pointer –  AJG85 Jun 6 '11 at 15:45
    
I think this might work. I have some test code with this now and it seems to work the way I need it to, however debugging just got a lot harder in VS2008 when I step through code to see the values :) thanks! –  Dave Jun 6 '11 at 17:03

You don't need both the list and the map. Maps support iteration in much the same way that lists do, so you can access the values in the map both quickly, via the key, and slowly by iterating. I'm also dubious why you are creating things using new - the array of char should probably be a std::string, and the objects themselves should probably be values.

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