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How can I create a numpy matrix with its elements being a function of its indices? For example, a multiplication table: a[i,j] = i*j

Un-numpy and un-pythonic would be to create an array of zeros and then loop through.

There is no doubt a better way to do this, without a loop.

However, even better would be to create the matrix straight-away.

Thanks in advance for your suggestions.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm away from my python at the moment, but does this one work?

array( [ [ i*j for j in xrange(5)] for i in xrange(5)] )
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It sure does... array() is deceptively powerful! –  Pete Jun 6 '11 at 16:55
    
Note that if you use this you have to be careful not to do np.array(( ( i*j for j in xrange(4096)) for i in xrange(4096)) ) for which the result is unexpected. jim-holmstroem.github.io/numpy/2014/11/23/… –  SlimJim Nov 29 at 14:59
    
Jim, I'm having trouble making sense of your link. I think you're warning against passing generator expressions in to numpy? stackoverflow.com/q/367565/770038 covers that too. –  tugs Dec 2 at 18:31

Here's one way to do that:

>>> indices = numpy.indices((5, 5))
>>> a = indices[0] * indices[1]
>>> a
array([[ 0,  0,  0,  0,  0],
       [ 0,  1,  2,  3,  4],
       [ 0,  2,  4,  6,  8],
       [ 0,  3,  6,  9, 12],
       [ 0,  4,  8, 12, 16]])

To further explain, numpy.indices((5, 5)) generates two arrays containing the x and y indices of a 5x5 array like so:

>>> numpy.indices((5, 5))
array([[[0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
        [1, 1, 1, 1, 1],
        [2, 2, 2, 2, 2],
        [3, 3, 3, 3, 3],
        [4, 4, 4, 4, 4]],

       [[0, 1, 2, 3, 4],
        [0, 1, 2, 3, 4],
        [0, 1, 2, 3, 4],
        [0, 1, 2, 3, 4],
        [0, 1, 2, 3, 4]]])

When you multiply these two arrays, numpy multiplies the value of the two arrays at each position and returns the result.

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Is that generalizable for a[i,j] = f(i,j)? –  Pete Jun 6 '11 at 16:53
    
It is, if the expression for f is vectorized. –  pv. Jun 8 '11 at 11:09

Just wanted to add that @Senderle's response can be generalized for any function and dimension:

dims = (3,3,3) #i,j,k
ii = np.indices(dims)

You could then calculate a[i,j,k] = i*j*k as

a = np.prod(ii,axis=0)

or a[i,j,k] = (i-1)*j*k:

a = (ii[0,...]-1)*ii[1,...]*ii[2,...]

etc

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For the multiplication

np.multiply.outer(np.arange(5), np.arange(5))  # a_ij = i * j

and in general

np.frompyfunc(
    lambda i, j: f(i, j), 2, 1
).outer(
    np.arange(5),
    np.arange(5),
).astype(np.float64)  # a_ij = f(i, j)

basically you create an np.ufunc via np.frompyfunc and then outer it with the indices.

Edit

Speed comparision between the different solutions.

Small matrices:

Eyy![1]: %timeit np.multiply.outer(np.arange(5), np.arange(5))
100000 loops, best of 3: 4.97 µs per loop

Eyy![2]: %timeit np.array( [ [ i*j for j in xrange(5)] for i in xrange(5)] )
100000 loops, best of 3: 5.51 µs per loop

Eyy![3]: %timeit indices = np.indices((5, 5)); indices[0] * indices[1]
100000 loops, best of 3: 16.1 µs per loop

Bigger matrices:

Eyy![4]: %timeit np.multiply.outer(np.arange(4096), np.arange(4096))
10 loops, best of 3: 62.4 ms per loop

Eyy![5]: %timeit indices = np.indices((4096, 4096)); indices[0] * indices[1]
10 loops, best of 3: 165 ms per loop

Eyy![6]: %timeit np.array( [ [ i*j for j in xrange(4096)] for i in xrange(4096)] )
1 loops, best of 3: 1.39 s per loop
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