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Currently I'm executing the following:

SELECT  SiteFeatures.SiteId, Blogs.FeatureInstance_Id as BlogId, 
        PageCollections.FeatureInstance_Id as PagesId, 
        Portfolios.FeatureInstance_Id as PortfolioId
FROM    SiteFeatures 
            LEFT OUTER JOIN Blogs 
                ON SiteFeatures.FeatureInstanceId = Blogs.FeatureInstance_id 
            LEFT OUTER JOIN Portfolios 
                ON SiteFeatures.FeatureInstanceId = Portfolios.FeatureInstance_id 
            LEFT OUTER JOIN PageCollections 
                ON SiteFeatures.FeatureInstanceId = PageCollections.FeatureInstance_id

This returns a result set like so:

SiteId      BlogId      PagesId     PortfolioId
1           1           NULL        NULL
1           NULL        1           NULL
1           NULL        NULL        1   
2           2           NULL        NULL
2           NULL        2           NULL
2           NULL        NULL        2   

Which means I am having to aggregate these within my application code. How can I change my query (with performance in mind) to return:

SiteId      BlogId      PagesId     PortfolioId
1           1           1           1
1           2           2           2

As requested - my schema:

dbdiagram

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2  
Can you show your table structures and PK/Fk relationships? –  HLGEM Jun 6 '11 at 16:25
1  
Do you need to use LEFT OUTER JOINS? Your example data seems to indicate otherwise. –  dpmattingly Jun 6 '11 at 16:28
2  
With given query, I can't imagine for the life of me how to get your initial output. Are you sure the data you've given us is representative? –  Lieven Keersmaekers Jun 6 '11 at 16:46
    
I can't even imagine it being a data issue... I don't see how that query, as given, can possibly return that resultset. –  Tom H. Jun 6 '11 at 18:07
    
I've added my schema as requested. Perhaps my original query wasn't the best - my SQL is a little 'ahem rusty, to say the least... –  Ben Foster Jun 6 '11 at 21:47

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted
SELECT
   S.SiteId,
   B.FeatureInstance_Id BlogId, 
   P.FeatureInstance_Id PortfolioId,
   C.FeatureInstance_Id PagesId
FROM
   Sites S
   LEFT JOIN (
      SiteFeatures F1
      INNER JOIN Blogs B ON F1.FeatureInstanceId = B.FeatureInstance_id
   ) ON S.SiteID = F1.SiteID
   LEFT JOIN (
      SiteFeatures F2
      INNER JOIN Portfolios P ON F2.FeatureInstanceId = P.FeatureInstance_id
   ) ON S.SiteID = F2.SiteID
   LEFT JOIN (
      SiteFeatures F3
      LEFT JOIN PageCollections C ON F3.FeatureInstanceId = C.FeatureInstance_id
   ) ON S.SiteID = F3.SiteID

This should work okay assuming that all your child tables can only have one row for each FeatureInstance_Id.

If you designed the database, you've earned a good rap on the knuckles for having inconsistent column names among the tables. :)

If this query works then you might consider encapsulating this in a series of views which will return the query to a nice compact thing:

CREATE VIEW BlogsFeature
AS
SELECT
   F.*
FROM
   SiteFeatures F
   WHERE EXISTS ( -- or you could do an INNER JOIN, though in theory this is correct
      SELECT 1
      FROM Blogs B
      WHERE F.FeatureInstanceId = B.FeatureInstance_id
   )

Doing this for all three tables will yield the following query:

SELECT
   S.SiteId,
   B.FeatureInstance_Id BlogId, 
   P.FeatureInstance_Id PortfolioId,
   C.FeatureInstance_Id PagesId
FROM
   Sites S
   LEFT JOIN BlogsFeature B ON S.SiteID = B.SiteID
   LEFT JOIN PortfoliosFeature P ON S.SiteID = P.SiteID
   LEFT JOIN PageCollections C O ON S.SiteID = C.SiteID

Actually, this made me think of another way to express the query you need, though it's still not very pretty-looking:

SELECT
   S.SiteId,
   F1.FeatureInstance_Id BlogId, 
   F2.FeatureInstance_Id PortfolioId,
   F3.FeatureInstance_Id PagesId
FROM
   Sites S
   LEFT JOIN SiteFeatures F1
      ON S.SiteID = F1.SiteID
      AND EXISTS (
         SELECT 1 FROM Blogs B
         WHERE F1.FeatureInstanceId = B.FeatureInstance_id
      ) 
   LEFT JOIN SiteFeatures F2
      ON S.SiteID = F2.SiteID
      AND EXISTS (
         SELECT 1 FROM Portfolios P
         WHERE F2.FeatureInstanceId = P.FeatureInstance_id
      )
   LEFT JOIN SiteFeatures F3
      ON S.SiteID = F3.SiteID
      AND EXISTS (
         SELECT 1 FROM PageCollections C
         WHERE F3.FeatureInstanceId = C.FeatureInstance_id
      )

You could use the Max() idea still if you converted your uniqueidentifiers to strings temporarily.

SELECT
   S.SiteId,
   B.FeatureInstance_Id BlogId, 
   P.FeatureInstance_Id PortfolioId,
   C.FeatureInstance_Id PagesId
FROM
   SiteFeatures F
   INNER JOIN Blogs B ON 
share|improve this answer
    
@Erik yes I know :) This is just a proof of concept and the schema has been generated by NHibernate. I'll fix up the column names correctly once we've finished these tests. –  Ben Foster Jun 6 '11 at 22:39
    
@Erik, this returned 54 records compared to the 6 on my original query. –  Ben Foster Jun 6 '11 at 22:47
    
@Ben I updated my query. Would you please try it again? –  ErikE Jun 7 '11 at 0:19
    
@Erik - Had to change to "SELECT S.SiteId, F1.FeatureInstanceId BlogId, F2.FeatureInstanceId PortfolioId, F3.FeatureInstanceId PagesId", but other than that, it works great. Thanks for your patience. –  Ben Foster Jun 7 '11 at 8:51
    
@Ben I presume you mean in my biggest EXISTS query? Fixed. –  ErikE Jun 7 '11 at 16:06
SELECT   SiteFeatures.SiteId
         , MAX(Blogs.FeatureInstance_Id) as BlogId
         , MAX(PageCollections.FeatureInstance_Id) as PagesId
         , MAX(Portfolios.FeatureInstance_Id) as PortfolioId
FROM     SiteFeatures 
LEFT OUTER JOIN Blogs 
         ON SiteFeatures.FeatureInstanceId = Blogs.FeatureInstance_id 
LEFT OUTER JOIN Portfolios 
         ON SiteFeatures.FeatureInstanceId = Portfolios.FeatureInstance_id 
LEFT OUTER JOIN PageCollections 
         ON SiteFeatures.FeatureInstanceId = PageCollections.FeatureInstance_id
GROUP BY SiteFeatures.SiteId
ORDER BY SiteFeatures.SiteId ASC
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for this. Unfortunately this won't work for me as my Id columns are unique identifiers (max won't work). This is my fault, I should have included more details about my schema. +1 anyway. –  Ben Foster Jun 6 '11 at 21:49
    
@Ben, updated the answer. –  Johan Jun 6 '11 at 21:55
    
Given the schema, the query added in your edit is incorrect. –  ErikE Jun 6 '11 at 22:03

Since your are using SQL Server 2008, here is one possible option using CROSS APPLY that might work for you. It may not be the best looking option here. I just gave it a shot.

SELECT          SFR.SiteId
            ,   BLG.FeatureInstance_Id  AS BlogId
            ,   PFL.FeatureInstance_Id  AS PortfolioId
            ,   PGC.FeatureInstance_Id  AS PagesId
FROM            dbo.SiteFeatures    SFR
CROSS APPLY     (
                    SELECT 
                    TOP 1   FeatureInstance_Id
                    FROM    dbo.Blogs BLG
                    WHERE   BLG.FeatureInstance_Id  = SFR.FeatureInstanceId
                ) BLG
CROSS APPLY     (
                    SELECT 
                    TOP 1   FeatureInstance_Id
                    FROM    dbo.PortFolios PFL
                    WHERE   PFL.FeatureInstance_Id  = SFR.FeatureInstanceId
                ) PFL
CROSS APPLY     (
                    SELECT 
                    TOP 1   FeatureInstance_Id
                    FROM    dbo.PageCollections PGC
                    WHERE   PGC.FeatureInstance_Id  = SFR.FeatureInstanceId
                ) PGC
share|improve this answer
    
interesting. This doesn't return any results (it does if only CROSS APPLY to BLG) but I'll give CROSS APPLY a go tomorrow. –  Ben Foster Jun 6 '11 at 22:56
    
that works. But gives me exactly the same as my original query :) Perhaps I should carry on doing aggregation within my application... –  Ben Foster Jun 6 '11 at 23:18

Have you tried using INNER JOINs and not LEFT JOINs ?

SELECT  SiteFeatures.SiteId
      , Blogs.FeatureInstance_Id as BlogId 
      , PageCollections.FeatureInstance_Id as PagesId 
      , Portfolios.FeatureInstance_Id as PortfolioId
FROM  SiteFeatures 
          INNER JOIN Blogs 
              ON SiteFeatures.FeatureInstanceId = Blogs.FeatureInstance_id 
          INNER JOIN Portfolios 
              ON SiteFeatures.FeatureInstanceId = Portfolios.FeatureInstance_id 
          INNER JOIN PageCollections 
              ON SiteFeatures.FeatureInstanceId = PageCollections.FeatureInstance_id

On second thought, this may be what you want:

SELECT  sf.SiteId
      , ( SELECT b.FeatureInstance_Id 
          FROM Blogs AS b
          WHERE sf.FeatureInstanceId = b.FeatureInstance_id
        )  AS BlogId 
      , ( SELECT pc.FeatureInstance_Id 
          FROM PageCollections AS pc
          WHERE sf.FeatureInstanceId = pc.FeatureInstance_id
        )  AS PagesId 
      , ( SELECT p.FeatureInstance_Id 
          FROM Portfolios  AS p
          WHERE sf.FeatureInstanceId = p.FeatureInstance_id
        )  AS PortfolioId
FROM  SiteFeatures  AS sf

On third thought (and after seeing Eric's answer that got accepted), I'll make one more try, just to show that it can be done with (this kind of) subqueries:

SELECT  s.SiteId
      , ( SELECT b.FeatureInstance_Id 
          FROM Blogs AS b
            JOIN SiteFeatures sf
              ON sf.FeatureInstanceId = b.FeatureInstance_id
          WHERE sf.SiteId = s.SiteId
        )  AS BlogId 
      , ( SELECT pc.FeatureInstance_Id 
          FROM PageCollections AS pc
            JOIN SiteFeatures sf
              ON sf.FeatureInstanceId = pc.FeatureInstance_id
          WHERE sf.SiteId = s.SiteId
        )  AS PagesId 
      , ( SELECT p.FeatureInstance_Id 
          FROM Portfolios  AS p
            JOIN SiteFeatures sf
              ON sf.FeatureInstanceId = p.FeatureInstance_id
          WHERE sf.SiteId = s.SiteId
        )  AS PortfolioId
FROM  Sites  AS s
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@Siva: Oops, thnx. –  ypercube Jun 6 '11 at 22:27
    
@ypercube - first query doesn't return any results. A site has many features but a feature only has a Blog OR Portfolio OR PageCollection. The second query just returns the same as what my original posted query returns. –  Ben Foster Jun 6 '11 at 22:43
    
@Ben: OK, then @Eric's answer seems what you want. (with INNER JOINs instead of LEFT JOINs) –  ypercube Jun 6 '11 at 22:53
    
@ypercube - I'm not so sure (see my comment on @Erik's answer). Gives me far more results than I had originally. –  Ben Foster Jun 6 '11 at 22:57
    
@Ben he's right, I needed the INNER JOINs. @ypercube, your updated query still won't work as the SiteFeatures table has one row for every Site Feature, including the ones that aren't correct for the current row. You have to take it up a step to SiteID. –  ErikE Jun 7 '11 at 0:21

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