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I have the following situation. A pseudo-code is attached below. I have a class A which has an object c of type D or E and this varies (actually its randomly decided). It uses b as a message for communication with a remote computer.

  1. So, how should I get the struct B to have different variables (float or double in this case)?
  2. Also, when I open a socket and transmit an object, the object will now have varying size. The remote computer does not have any idea whether the object has a size corresponding to sizeof(int) + sizeof(float) OR sizeof(int) + sizeof(double). I need the size as a parameter to receive the packets, so how can I solve this?

Code:

class C 
{
  ...
};

class D: public C
{
  ...
};

class E: public C
{
  ...
};

struct B
{
  int a;
  // If A->c is of type D
  float b;
  // If A->c is of type E
  double b;
};

class A
{
  B b;
  C *c;
  A()
  {
    c = (C*) new D;
    //c = (C*) new E;
  }
  ...
  ...
  void transmit()
  {
    //b has some attributes depending on whether c is of type D or E
    //Open a socket and send packets via UDP
    //The remote host receives the packets
  }
};

I hope this explains my problem. If it is not clear or ambiguous, please let me know. I will provide more details and explanation. Thanks in advance.

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5 Answers 5

Either use a factory pattern to create the objects at runtime.

Or, use a template:

template <class T>
class A {
   T a;
}


A<int> a = new A<int>();
A<double> b = new A<double>();

Second part is easy.
In your send-receive protocol keep 4 bytes at the beginning for sizeof (int) ... Then fill it with sizeof(a)

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Thanks for the reply. What you are saying will solve the part 1 of question, but not the second part. I need a solution which works for both the parts. –  Neel Mehta Jun 6 '11 at 18:13

Since both D and E derive from C your implementation looks correct:

c = (C*) new D;

Though I would remove the C-Cast (it is not required, if you need casts you should use the C++ variants).

c = new D;

How you transmit the data will depend. But usually you will need to prefix that part of the information with type information so the destination understands how to decode the following stream.

send(a->a);
send("1") if a->c is D
send("2") if a->c is E
send(<Conditional Part>);

As a side note. Look up smart pointers. Using a raw pointer in your class is a bad idea (and not good C++).

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Thanks for the reply. I cannot send the packets in parts, thats a limitation that I have. I need to send it as a single packet. Any idea how I can do that? –  Neel Mehta Jun 6 '11 at 18:22

Working on Plain C++ and raw socket is really hectic and many end up in passing structure through socket without thinking the other problems rises due to that..

  1. You need to aware of big-endian and host-endian conversions
  2. Not all the compiler handles the struct as it is.. you often need to use the #pragma pack to force handle the size of the struct. Some compilers doesn't support this.

If you don't worry about performance, I would recommend to send the data as a XML/ini content which is easy to parse..INI readers comes with handy that you could read arguments as float or double..

If you still prefer binary content, I would recommend to learn ASN.1 notations but at least you need 2 weeks to fully practices for your project, then you will end of using existing protocol or to use your custom protocol..

So there is no direct solution to your question. Instead of sending in memory copy of structure, you could ask your class C or D to send the serialized data over socket with the type of the object as a first byte, length of the data in next 2/4 bytes, the actual data to follow in rest.. You then implement a reader class which reads the first byte and then it decides the type of the object, then delegate the call to the corresponding class to read the rest of the data.

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Thanks for the reply. But I do not have the option of breaking the packets into parts because of a certain limitation that I have, and hence I need to send it as a single packet. Any ideas? –  Neel Mehta Jun 6 '11 at 18:23

First of all, your class hierarchy looks suspicious. From what you've shown, there is no relationship between B and C other than the existence of a third type, A, which contains a B object and a C pointer. And yet, the type of a variable inside B should depend on what subclass of C is pointed to by that pointer inside the A object?

This seems like unnecessary coupling. Why not just incorporate that field of B in the respective subclasses of C?

Assuming you've fixed up your class hierarchy, you're left with the relatively straight-forward issue of wanting to send one of two different types of messages (with different sizes) over a socket. Here's one solution:

enum message_type {type1, type2};

class message_type1
{
    ...
};

class message_type2
{
    ...
};

// when sending message (pseudocode)
write message_type variable
write message_type1 object OR message_type2 object

// when reading message (pseudocode)
read message_type variable
if type1
    read message_type1 object
else
    read message_type2 object

Of course, message_type1 and message_type2 can be related by being subclasses of the same base class, or instantiations of the same template etc. to avoid repetition if the two message types have some things in common.

EDIT: You mentioned in comments to other answers that you cannot split your message into different packets. Can you clarify what this means? "Packet" it not a precise term: TCP has segments, UDP and IP have datagrams, and Ethernet has frames. Neither of these have anything to do with how many times you call send() on the socket (i.e. two calls to send() does not necessarily mean two TCP segments are sent; conversely, placing a single call to send() does not guarantee that your data will be transmitted in a single segment).

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Basically, I have a queue into which I push these packets, and a thread runs separately which keeps on transmitting these packets from the queue. If I wish to transmit packets of different sizes, then I need to change some other part of the codes too and I do not want to bring about lots of changes if avoidable. Also, in my system the communication is a barrier for realtime performance. Calling in more send syntaxes would make the performance worse. But if there is no other way out, then I would have to do what you have mentioned. –  Neel Mehta Jun 6 '11 at 19:01
    
@Neel: I'm not sure what you mean by "calling in more send syntaxes", but let me repeat that calling send() twice is not likely to be any slower than calling it once when the the extra call just contains a few bytes of data. If this still bothers you, you can concatenate the two pieces yourself in a buffer, and send the buffer in a single call to send(). –  HighCommander4 Jun 8 '11 at 0:05
    
Actually I have a queue, so if I can push the object into the queue, then I would be happy as I wont have to make any changes in the code, else it creates many other problems for me as the queue is used for applications other than sending packets too. Even if I concatenate the two buffers, I wont be able to still get it running as the receiving end would not have the information about the size of the concatenated buffer. –  Neel Mehta Jun 8 '11 at 0:29
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Union can be used to solve the problem.

struct B
{
  int a;
  bool d; //d = 0 for D and 1 for E
  union
  {
    float b;
    double c;
  }
};
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