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I need to duplicate processing of this AWK script but cannot figure out what it is doing. Can anyone please advise what the basic function of this script is?

It takes an input file, and creates an output file but I do not have access to either files to see what it is doing. It has something to do with the pipe delimiter which delimits columns in the input file.

{ 
   if (NR == 1) {
     line = $0
     len = length(line)
       newlen = len
     while ( substr(line,newlen-1,1) == "|" )
       {
         newlen = newlen - 1
       }
     line = substr(line,1,newlen-1)
   }
     else {
     print line
     line = $0
     }
 }
 END{
      len = length(line)
      newlen = len
    while ( substr(line,newlen-1,1) == "|" ) {
      newlen = newlen - 1
    }
    line = substr(line,1,newlen-1)
      print line
}
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

it looks like it's trimming all trailing pipe chars on the first and last lines only.

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Ok, this makes sense I suppose the BCP process is creating extraneous pipe chars. Thank you very much. –  DisplacedGuy Jun 6 '11 at 19:10
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Wow, whoever wrote this must have been paid by the line.

The block of code that occurs twice, from len = length(line) to line = substr(line,1,newlen-1), is doing a string transformation that could be simply (and more clearly) expressed as a regular expression replacement. It's calculating the number of | characters at the end of line and stripping them. When the line ends with a character other than |, one character is stripped (this may be accidental). This could be simply performed as gsub(/(\|+|.)$/, "", line), or gsub(/\|+)$/, "", line) if the behavior with no final | doesn't matter.

As for the overall structure, there are three parts in the code: what's done for the first line (if (NR == 1) {…}, what's done for other lines (else {…}), and what's done after the last line (END {…}). On the first line, the variable line is set to $0 transformed. On subsequent lines, the saved line is printed then line is set to the current line. Finally the last line is printed, transformed. This print-previous-then-save-current pattern is a common trick to act differently on the last line: when you read a line, you can't know whether it's the last one, so you save it, print the previous line and move on; in the END block you do that different thing for the last line.

Here's how I'd write it. The data flow is similarly nontrivial (but hardly contrived either), but at least it's not drowned in a messy text transformation.

function cleanup (line) { gsub(/(\|+|.)$/, "", line); return line }
NR != 1 { print prev }
{ prev = (NR == 1 ? cleanup($0) : $0) }
END { print cleanup(prev) }
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Nice, informative. +1'ed –  stefgosselin Jun 6 '11 at 22:35
    
Cool, thanks for example. +1'd –  DisplacedGuy Jun 7 '11 at 20:03
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I may be wrong but on quick glance it seems to filter out the | caracter in a file.

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That is what I was thinking too... do you think it is removing the character entirely or leaving a blank it's place? It was taking a delimted database file (bcp from sybase) so I'm thinking they were removing the delimiters. Possibly removing the header record?? –  DisplacedGuy Jun 6 '11 at 17:46
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