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Why can't bee() call bar() unless I prepend self:: ?

class X {
    function bar ()
    {
            echo "OK";
    }
    public static function bee ()
    {
            bar ();
    }
};
$x = new X ();
$x->bee ();
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2  
maybe because it is static? –  Tim Jun 6 '11 at 18:57

3 Answers 3

static functions do not have access to the $this pointer, but what you have written there is actually trying to call the global function bar(). A regular call to a method on $x would be something like:

class X
{
    ...
    static function Bee()
    {
        $this->Bar();
    }
}

but this is not good practice because then your static function depends on being called from an object and there is no point in having it be static.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Method_(computer_programming)#Static_methods

As mentioned above, a method may be declared as static, meaning that it acts at the class level rather than at the instance level. Therefore, a static method cannot refer to a specific instance of the class (i.e. it cannot refer to this, self, Me, etc.), unless such references are made through a parameter referencing an instance of the class, although in such cases they must be accessed through the parameter's identifier instead of this. Most importantly there is no need to make an object for accessing data .i.e. without creating an object we can access the data members of a static class.

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1  
Actually using $this->bar() does not work and gives a runtime error. –  qwertyu Jun 6 '11 at 19:06
    
Good. Are you sure it is a run time error? It should croak at compile time, but that may be me mixing up issues with other things. If it is important ill look into it deeper later. Suffice to say that it is not something you should/can do. –  Bob_Gneu Jun 6 '11 at 19:08
1  
Its not a compile time error, because PHP don't check on methods while parsing. "Undefined xy" are always runtime errors. –  KingCrunch Jun 6 '11 at 19:09
    
No, it compiles just fine. At runtime it says PHP Fatal error: Using $this when not in object context in /home/me/foo.php on line 11 –  qwertyu Jun 6 '11 at 19:10
    
more power to you for checking first. Thank you for the clarification =) –  Bob_Gneu Jun 6 '11 at 19:17

you are insight of a static method. Inside of a static method you are not in the object context so you cannot call the method with $this, ...

self::bar() or X::bar (); does the job...

But be carefull. Stuff like that is not possible if you call it from a static method:

function bar ()
    {
            echo $this->test;
    }

I would not make the method static unless you need it!

BR,

TJ

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Thanks, you are correct about that. –  qwertyu Jun 6 '11 at 19:09

Static methods get called via the scope resolution operator ::

X::bee();

Then inside bee() you call bar(), what is a regular function, not a method. Here you must call it the same way as mentioned above, but you can simplify the scope identifier to self

public static bee () {
  self::bar();
}

Just to remember: Every "function" inside a class is in real a method. If you omit the visibility identifier public is implicitly assumed, but it will remain a method and must be called like this.

I see bar() is not static. To call a regular method you need an instance of the object within the context you are going to call it. Here you can either make bee() non-static (then $this as reference to the current object is avaible), or you instanciate a new object within bee().

class X {
  public function bar () { /* .. */ }
  public function bee () { $this->bar(); }
}
$x = new X;
$x->bee();

or

class X {
  public function bar () { /* .. */ }
  public static function bee () {
    $x = new self();
    $x->bar();
  }
}
X:bee();

Whats better depends on what the methods should do (meaning: Whats the design of the class in whole):

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