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Note: this appears to have been fixed in Roslyn

This question arose when writing my answer to this one, which talks about the associativity of the null-coalescing operator.

Just as a reminder, the idea of the null-coalescing operator is that an expression of the form

x ?? y

first evaluates x, then:

  • If the value of x is null, y is evaluated and that is the end result of the expression
  • If the value of x is non-null, y is not evaluated, and the value of x is the end result of the expression, after a conversion to the compile-time type of y if necessary

Now usually there's no need for a conversion, or it's just from a nullable type to a non-nullable one - usually the types are the same, or just from (say) int? to int. However, you can create your own implicit conversion operators, and those are used where necessary.

For the simple case of x ?? y, I haven't seen any odd behaviour. However, with (x ?? y) ?? z I see some confusing behaviour.

Here's a short but complete test program - the results are in the comments:

using System;

public struct A
{
    public static implicit operator B(A input)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("A to B");
        return new B();
    }

    public static implicit operator C(A input)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("A to C");
        return new C();
    }
}

public struct B
{
    public static implicit operator C(B input)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("B to C");
        return new C();
    }
}

public struct C {}

class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        A? x = new A();
        B? y = new B();
        C? z = new C();
        C zNotNull = new C();

        Console.WriteLine("First case");
        // This prints
        // A to B
        // A to B
        // B to C
        C? first = (x ?? y) ?? z;

        Console.WriteLine("Second case");
        // This prints
        // A to B
        // B to C
        var tmp = x ?? y;
        C? second = tmp ?? z;

        Console.WriteLine("Third case");
        // This prints
        // A to B
        // B to C
        C? third = (x ?? y) ?? zNotNull;
    }
}

So we have three custom value types, A, B and C, with conversions from A to B, A to C, and B to C.

I can understand both the second case and the third case... but why is there an extra A to B conversion in the first case? In particular, I'd really have expected the first case and second case to be the same thing - it's just extracting an expression into a local variable, after all.

Any takers on what's going on? I'm extremely hesistant to cry "bug" when it comes to the C# compiler, but I'm stumped as to what's going on...

EDIT: Okay, here's a nastier example of what's going on, thanks to configurator's answer, which gives me further reason to think it's a bug. EDIT: The sample doesn't even need two null-coalescing operators now...

using System;

public struct A
{
    public static implicit operator int(A input)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("A to int");
        return 10;
    }
}

class Test
{
    static A? Foo()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Foo() called");
        return new A();
    }

    static void Main()
    {
        int? y = 10;

        int? result = Foo() ?? y;
    }
}

The output of this is:

Foo() called
Foo() called
A to int

The fact that Foo() gets called twice here is hugely surprising to me - I can't see any reason for the expression to be evaluated twice.

share|improve this question
17  
I bet they thought "nobody will ever use it in that way" :) –  cyberzed Jun 6 '11 at 19:17
28  
Want to see something worse? Try using this line with all the implicit conversions: C? first = ((B?)(((B?)x) ?? ((B?)y))) ?? ((C?)z);. You'll get: Internal Compiler Error: likely culprit is 'CODEGEN' –  configurator Jun 6 '11 at 20:03
4  
@Peter unlikely pattern, but plausible for (("working value" ?? "user default") ?? "system default") –  Factor Mystic Jun 7 '11 at 0:17
39  
@q0987: Sure. Ten points to Gryffindor! –  Eric Lippert Jun 8 '11 at 20:05
11  
@yes123: When it was dealing with just the conversion, I wasn't entirely convinced. Seeing it execute a method twice made it pretty obvious this was a bug. You'd be amazed at some behaviour which looks incorrect but is actually completely correct. The C# team is smarter than me - I tend to assume I'm being stupid until I've proved that something is their fault. –  Jon Skeet Jun 13 '11 at 10:55
show 12 more comments

6 Answers

up vote 264 down vote accepted

Thanks to everyone who contributed to analyzing this issue. It is clearly a compiler bug. It appears to only happen when there is a lifted conversion involving two nullable types on the left-hand side of the coalescing operator.

I have not yet identified where precisely things go wrong, but at some point during the "nullable lowering" phase of compilation -- after initial analysis but before code generation -- we reduce the expression

result = Foo() ?? y;

from the example above to the moral equivalent of:

A? temp = Foo();
result = temp.HasValue ? 
    new int?(A.op_implicit(Foo().Value)) : 
    y;

Clearly that is incorrect; the correct lowering is

result = temp.HasValue ? 
    new int?(A.op_implicit(temp.Value)) : 
    y;

My best guess based on my analysis so far is that the nullable optimizer is going off the rails here. We have a nullable optimizer that looks for situations where we know that a particular expression of nullable type cannot possibly be null. Consider the following naive analysis: we might first say that

result = Foo() ?? y;

is the same as

A? temp = Foo();
result = temp.HasValue ? 
    (int?) temp : 
    y;

and then we might say that

conversionResult = (int?) temp 

is the same as

A? temp2 = temp;
conversionResult = temp2.HasValue ? 
    new int?(op_Implicit(temp2.Value)) : 
    (int?) null

But the optimizer can step in and say "whoa, wait a minute, we already checked that temp is not null; there's no need to check it for null a second time just because we are calling a lifted conversion operator". We'd them optimize it away to just

new int?(op_Implicit(temp2.Value)) 

My guess is that we are somewhere caching the fact that the optimized form of (int?)Foo() is new int?(op_implicit(Foo().Value)) but that is not actually the optimized form we want; we want the optimized form of Foo()-replaced-with-temporary-and-then-converted.

Many bugs in the C# compiler are a result of bad caching decisions. A word to the wise: every time you cache a fact for use later, you are potentially creating an inconsistency should something relevant change. In this case the relevant thing that has changed post initial analysis is that the call to Foo() should always be realized as a fetch of a temporary.

We did a lot of reorganization of the nullable rewriting pass in C# 3.0. The bug reproduces in C# 3.0 and 4.0 but not in C# 2.0, which means that the bug was probably my bad. Sorry!

I'll get a bug entered into the database and we'll see if we can get this fixed up for a future version of the language. Thanks again everyone for your analysis; it was very helpful!

share|improve this answer
117  
+1 for humility: "the bug was probably my bad" –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Jun 8 '11 at 17:07
10  
@Galilyou, I gotta learn to write better bugs! –  Christopher Harris Oct 21 '11 at 7:18
6  
-10 Points to Ravenclaw! –  sleeplessnerd Dec 5 '11 at 2:32
8  
Eric Lippert does't write bugs, we just have to write workarounds. –  Marlon May 26 '12 at 19:43
200  
When Jon Skeet has a question, the C# team apologizes. –  Tim S. May 28 '12 at 12:34
show 2 more comments

This is most definitely a bug.

public class Program {
    static A? X() {
        Console.WriteLine("X()");
        return new A();
    }
    static B? Y() {
        Console.WriteLine("Y()");
        return new B();
    }
    static C? Z() {
        Console.WriteLine("Z()");
        return new C();
    }

    public static void Main() {
        C? test = (X() ?? Y()) ?? Z();
    }
}

This code will output:

X()
X()
A to B (0)
X()
X()
A to B (0)
B to C (0)

That made me think that the first part of each ?? coalesce expression is evaluated twice. This code proved it:

B? test= (X() ?? Y());

outputs:

X()
X()
A to B (0)

This seems to happen only when the expression requires a conversion between two nullable types; I've tried various permutations with one of the sides being a string, and none of them caused this behaviour.

share|improve this answer
7  
Wow - evaluating the expression twice seems very wrong indeed. Well spotted. –  Jon Skeet Jun 6 '11 at 21:14
    
It's slightly simpler to see if you only have one method call in the source - but that still demonstrates it very clearly. –  Jon Skeet Jun 6 '11 at 21:15
2  
I've added a slightly simpler example of this "double evaluation" to my question. –  Jon Skeet Jun 6 '11 at 22:05
7  
Are all your methods supposed to be outputting "X()"? It makes it somewhat difficult to tell what method is actually outputting to the console. –  jeffora Jun 6 '11 at 22:41
    
@jeffora: Whoops! Luckily my conclusions were right even though my experiment was wrong; I updatd the methods to output their names correctly (and checked that I still only get X()s in the output). –  configurator Jun 7 '11 at 14:33
show 2 more comments

If you take a look at the generated code for the Left-grouped case it actually does something like this (csc /optimize-):

C? first;
A? atemp = a;
B? btemp = (atemp.HasValue ? new B?(a.Value) : b);
if (btemp.HasValue)
{
    first = new C?((atemp.HasValue ? new B?(a.Value) : b).Value);
}

Another find, if you use first it will generate a shortcut if both a and b are null and return c. Yet if a or b is non-null it re-evaluates a as part of the implicit conversion to B before returning which of a or b is non-null.

From the C# 4.0 Specification, §6.1.4:

  • If the nullable conversion is from S? to T?:
    • If the source value is null (HasValue property is false), the result is the null value of type T?.
    • Otherwise, the conversion is evaluated as an unwrapping from S? to S, followed by the underlying conversion from S to T, followed by a wrapping (§4.1.10) from T to T?.

This appears to explain the second unwrapping-wrapping combination.


The C# 2008 and 2010 compiler produce very similar code, however this looks like a regression from the C# 2005 compiler (8.00.50727.4927) which generates the following code for the above:

A? a = x;
B? b = a.HasValue ? new B?(a.GetValueOrDefault()) : y;
C? first = b.HasValue ? new C?(b.GetValueOrDefault()) : z;

I wonder if this is not due to the additional magic given to the type inference system?

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for going to the spec. –  Rusty Jun 6 '11 at 20:29
    
+1, but I don't think it really explains why the conversion is performed twice. It should only be evaluating the expression once, IMO. –  Jon Skeet Jun 6 '11 at 21:12
    
@Jon: I've been playing around and found (as @configurator did) that when done in an Expression Tree it works as expected. Working on cleaning up the expressions to add it to my post. I would have to posit then that this is a "bug". –  user7116 Jun 6 '11 at 21:15
    
@Jon: ok when using Expression Trees it turns (x ?? y) ?? z into nested lambdas, which ensures in-order evaluation without double evaluation. This is obviously not the approach taken by the C# 4.0 compiler. From what I can tell, section 6.1.4 is approached in a very strict manner in this particular code path and the temporaries are not elided resulting in the double evaluation. –  user7116 Jun 7 '11 at 2:37
add comment
Console.WriteLine("First case");
    A? a2 = a;
    B? b2 = a2.HasValue ? new B?(a.Value) : b;
    if (b2.HasValue)
    {
        a2 = a;
        B? b3 = a2.HasValue ? new B?(a.Value) : b;
        new C?(b3.Value);
    }
    Console.WriteLine("Second case");
    a2 = a;
    B? b4 = a2.HasValue ? new B?(a.Value) : b;
    b2 = b4;
    C? arg_FB_0 = b2.HasValue ? new C?(b4.Value) : c;
    Console.WriteLine("Third case");
    a2 = a;
    b2 = (a2.HasValue ? new B?(a.Value) : b);
    C? c3 = new C?(b2.HasValue ? b2.GetValueOrDefault() : c2);

Answer is in decompiled code. It is evaluating first expression twice. I don't see any reason to re-evaluate the expression again. I'd call it a bug.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Actually, I'll call this a bug now, with the clearer example. This still holds, but the double-evaluation is certainly not good.

It seems as though A ?? B is implemented as A.HasValue ? A : B. In this case, there's a lot of casting too (following the regular casting for the ternary ?: operator). But if you ignore all that, then this makes sense based on how it's implemented:

  1. A ?? B expands to A.HasValue ? A : B
  2. A is our x ?? y. Expand to x.HasValue : x ? y
  3. replace all occurrences of A -> (x.HasValue : x ? y).HasValue ? (x.HasValue : x ? y) : B

Here you can see that x.HasValue is checked twice, and if x ?? y requires casting, x will be cast twice.

I'd put it down simply as an artifact of how ?? is implemented, rather than a compiler bug. Take-Away: Don't create implicit casting operators with side effects.

It seems to be a compiler bug revolving around how ?? is implemented. Take-away: don't nest coalescing expressions with side-effects.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for your take-away advice. –  Daniel Pryden Jun 6 '11 at 19:57
    
Oh I definitely wouldn't want to use code like this normally, but I think it could still be classed as a compiler bug in that your first expansion should include "but only evaluating A and B once". (Imagine if they were method calls.) –  Jon Skeet Jun 6 '11 at 21:13
    
@Jon I agree that it could be as well - but I wouldn't call it clear-cut. Well, actually, I can see that A() ? A() : B() will possibly evaluate A() twice, but A() ?? B() not so much. And since it only happens on casting... Hmm.. I've just talked myself into thinking it is certainly not behaving correctly. –  Philip Rieck Jun 6 '11 at 22:09
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I am not a C# expert at all as you can see from my question history, but, I tried this out and I think it is a bug.... but as a newbie, I have to say that I do not understand everything going on here so I will delete my answer if I am way off.

I have come to this bug conclusion by making a different version of your program which deals with the same scenario, but much less complicated.

I am using three null integer properties with backing stores. I set each to 4 and then run int? something2 = (A ?? B) ?? C;

(Full code here)

This just reads the A and nothing else.

This statement to me looks like to me it should:

  1. Start in the brackets, look at A, return A and finish if A is not null.
  2. If A was null, evaluate B, finish if B is not null
  3. If A and B were null, evaluate C.

So, as A is not null, it only looks at A and finishes.

In your example, putting a breakpoint at the First Case shows that x, y and z are all not null and therefore, I would expect them to be treated the same as my less complex example.... but I fear I am too much of a C# newbie and have missed the point of this question completely!

share|improve this answer
4  
Jon's example is somewhat of an obscure corner case in that he is using a nullable struct (a value-type which is "similar" to the built-in types like an int). He pushes the case further into an obscure corner by providing multiple implicit type conversions. This requires the compiler to change the type of the data while checking against null. It is because of these implicit type conversions that his example is different from yours. –  user7116 Jun 6 '11 at 20:51
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protected by Subhrajyoti Majumder Feb 25 at 7:21

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