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$a = $b = 0;

In the above code, are both $a and $b assigned the value of 0, or is $a just referencing $b?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 16 down vote accepted

With raw types this is a copy.

test.php

$a = $b = 0;

$b = 3; 

var_dump($a);
var_dump($b);

Output:

int(0) 
int(3)

With objects though, that is another story (PHP 5)

test.php

class Obj
{ 
    public $_name;
}

$a = $b = new Obj();

$b->_name = 'steve';

var_dump($a);
var_dump($b);

Output

object(Obj)#1 (1) { ["_name"]=> string(5) "steve" } 
object(Obj)#1 (1) { ["_name"]=> string(5) "steve" }
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2  
Note, that the example is misleading: Changing the property of an object is not the same as changing the variable the object is referenced from. Because the variable never changed, it is of course the same. –  KingCrunch Dec 30 '11 at 19:00
    
According to documentation, PHP uses a copy on write system. It means that with primitive types such as strings or ints are really created in memory on change. That's why, contrary to what we might think, creating references to optimize performance on small variables may not bring the desired effect, because PHP needs to create it before. However, objects are passed by reference by default since PHP5. –  bgondy Apr 11 '13 at 17:00

Regard this code as:

$a = ($b = 0);

The expression $b = 0 not only assigns 0 to $b, but it yields a result as well. That result is the right part of the assignment, or simply the value that $b got assigned to.

So, $a gets assigned 0 as well.

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You could have tried it yourself

$a = $b = 0;
$a = 5;
echo $b;

or

$a = $b = 0;
$b = 5;
echo $a;

(currently I dont really care :D)

Thus: No, they are both independent variables with the value 0.

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In that example, wouldn't you have to assign 5 to $b on the second line to prove the reference was not present? and yes, you are correct. I figured having the question up here would be nice for others searching as well though... –  Evil Elf Jun 6 '11 at 19:47
    
@Evil: Don't want to think about it, so added the other way round too. Both return 0, thus it must be true in any case :) –  KingCrunch Jun 6 '11 at 19:49
    
I learned something today. it may be small, but always fun. –  Evil Elf Jun 6 '11 at 19:54

I'll recommend a good read on this: http://terriswallow.com/weblog/2007/multiple-and-dynamic-variable-assignment-in-php/ . In one of comments, you can read:

It should be noted that if you use multiple assignment on one line to assign an object, the object is assigned by reference. Therefore, if you change the value of the object’s property using either variable, the value essentially changes in both.

So I'll personally recommend that you assign the variables separately.

For the record:

$a = $b = 4;
var_dump($a, $b);
$b = 5;
var_dump($a, $b);

Yields:

int(4)
int(4)
int(4)
int(5)

But:

class Tmp
    {
    public $foo;

    public function __construct()
        {
        $this->foo = 'bar';
        }
    }

$a = $b = new Tmp();
var_dump($a, $b);
$a->foo = 'oth';
var_dump($a, $b);

Yields:

object(Tmp)#1 (1) {
  ["foo"]=>
  string(3) "bar"
}
object(Tmp)#1 (1) {
  ["foo"]=>
  string(3) "bar"
}
object(Tmp)#1 (1) {
  ["foo"]=>
  string(3) "oth"
}
object(Tmp)#1 (1) {
  ["foo"]=>
  string(3) "oth"
}

So the conclusion is that there is no reference for primitives, but there IS a reference to objects.

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we proved this false actually with some tests. –  Evil Elf Jun 6 '11 at 20:15
    
I've updated my answer. –  Tomasz Kowalczyk Jun 6 '11 at 20:26

Both $a and $b are assigned that value of 0. If you wanted $a to reference $b, you would preempt it with an ampersand, e.g.:

$a = & $b = 0;

http://php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.basic.php

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its assigns them both the value of 0

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