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I am having a little trouble understanding the following:

test.html

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html dir="ltr" lang="en-US">
<head>
<meta charset="UTF-8" />
<title>CSS Test</title>
<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" media="all" href="test.css" />
</head>
<body>
    <div id="id_main">
        <div id="id_item1" class="item">
            <p>Item 1</p>
        </div>
        <div id="id_item2" class="item">
            <p>
                Item 2 - This item has more text than the first item
                and it shows because the text wraps around and changes
                the vertical size of the item.
            </p>
        </div>
        <div id="id_item3" class="item">
            <p>Item 3</p>
        </div>
        <div id="id_item4" class="item">
            <p>Item 4</p>
        </div>
        <div id="id_item5" class="item">
            <p>Item 5</p>
        </div>
        </div>
</body>
</html>

test.css

#id_main {
    width: 50%;
    margin-left: auto;
    margin-right: auto;
    background-color: teal;
    vertical-align: top;
}

div.item {
    border: 1px solid black;
    display: inline-block;
    width: 255px;
    text-align: center;
    background-color: grey;
    height: 129px;
}

Since the items all have uniform widths and heights, I was expecting that the items would display in a grid almost like a table. In the first row, though, item1 is aligned with the bottom of the row and item2 is aligned with the top! And the row is larger than the height of either item. Why does this happen?

Thanks,

Carl

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jsfiddle.net/WMZdD –  Jared Farrish Jun 6 '11 at 19:57
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to add vertical-align: top to div.item:

http://jsfiddle.net/DZzc5/2/

div.item {
    border: 1px solid black;
    display: inline-block;
    vertical-align: top;
    width: 255px;
    text-align: center;
    background-color: grey;
    height: 129px;
}

To understand why this is required, I recommend you read this:

http://blog.mozilla.com/webdev/2009/02/20/cross-browser-inline-block/

Specifically, the part talking about "the baseline".

share|improve this answer
    
@thirtydot - In FF4, if you click on the fiddle I link to in the question comments, I'm not seeing a discernible difference between the one you link to and mine (except the width of the container). In fact, if I remove the width override, they look essentially identical. –  Jared Farrish Jun 6 '11 at 20:08
    
@thirtydot - Also, my initial thought was that the vertical-align was on the wrong selector. Is it just that another browser is not displaying it correctly (IE, I am trying not to look at YOU...)? –  Jared Farrish Jun 6 '11 at 20:10
    
Make your window wider: i.stack.imgur.com/ebAdi.png –  thirtydot Jun 6 '11 at 20:12
    
@thirtydot - Oh, I see. Or, I suppose, I didn't see. :) –  Jared Farrish Jun 6 '11 at 20:13
    
No, it's not a case of IE misbehaving. It's just how display: inline-block works: see the bottom part of my answer. –  thirtydot Jun 6 '11 at 20:13
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I've had this happen to me, usually adding the following in both css definition helps me

float: left;  /* or right, whichever you prefer */
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Firstly, your doctype is invalid - you might want to address that, though that shouldn't be the problem - it can cause some others.

I recommend reading: http://www.alistapart.com/articles/doctype/

You didn't float your divs - a block level element in CSS acts as though it goes across its whole container - even if it has a width that means it doesn't visibly render that way. By using FLOAT, you can change this behavior.

Here's another good read: http://www.w3schools.com/css/css_float.asp

#id_main {
    width: 820px;
    height: 800px;
    margin-left: auto;
    margin-right: auto;
    background-color: teal;
    vertical-align: top;
}

div.item {
    border: 1px solid black;
    width: 400px;
    height: 129px;
    overflow: hidden;
    text-align: center;
    background-color: grey;
    float: left;

}

Finally, heres a fiddle of your code with tweaked CSS: http://jsfiddle.net/wmxEb/1/

Enjoy!

share|improve this answer
    
Your facts here are a bit off. <!DOCTYPE html> is a valid doctype. Read: 1 and 2. You've linked to an article on doctypes that's almost a decade old. Yes, he didn't float his elements, but he used `display: inline-block. Read: 3. And lastly, you linked to w3schools - please don't do it: http://w3fools.com/ –  thirtydot Jun 6 '11 at 20:07
    
Not everyone can or does use the latest browsers (unfortunately) so it can never hurt to explicitly provide doctypes that browsers old and new both understand. W3Schools may not be the most informative site, and it doesn't always provide the exact answer being looked for, but its always a good place to start. As far as the behavior of inline-block, I stand corrected - we can all learn something here on StackOverflow :) –  Codecraft Jun 6 '11 at 20:17
    
You shouldn't link to W3Schools if only for the purely selfish reason that it will get you downvotes if you do it often enough. Please actually read it: w3fools.com. <!DOCTYPE html> will trigger Standards Mode in "all browsers". Even IE6. Nobody uses anything older than IE6. –  thirtydot Jun 6 '11 at 20:22
    
Alright, it looks like you got me again - I have always just assumed w3schools was in fact affiliated with W3C, and I have referred to it in the past myself (though admittedly for nothing more complicated than forgetting a tag name, I always used it as a source for absolute the absolute basics - hence I probably never spotted any mistakes because I wasn't looking for them). Its actually made me pretty annoyed that its not part of W3 and yet its sort of made out to be. They're off my Christmas card list for sure, now that I know that. –  Codecraft Jun 6 '11 at 20:37
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