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I'm having unexpected behavior with the .Contains() function of the where clause in Linq to XML. It seems to be functioning like "==" not Contains() in the string function.

Example:

var q = from sr in SearchResults.Descendants("Result")
    where _filters.Contains((string)sr.Element("itemtype"))
    orderby (string)sr.Element("ipitemtype") ascending
    select new SearchItem
    {
        //Create Object
        ID = (string)sr.Element("blabla"),
    }

_filters is a list of strings. Let's say it contains 3 values:

_filters[0] = "videos";
_filters[1] = "documents";
_filters[2] = "cat pictures";

What happens now, is that the Query works perfectly if

<itemtype>videos</itemtype> 

is the XML node.

However, if the node is

<itemtype>videos mission critical document advertising</itemtype>, 

the IEnumerable returns blank, which to me says the operand is functioning like "==" not "Contains()".

Any idea what I'm doing wrong?

Winning answer from dtb:

replace

where _filters.Contains((string)sr.Element("itemtype"))

with

where _filters.Any(filter => ((string)sr.Element("itemtype")).Contains(filter))
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please review my new answer - the original one was mistaken. –  smartcaveman Jun 6 '11 at 20:51
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this:

_filters.Any(s => ((string)sr.Element("itemtype") ?? "").Contains(s))

This way you're checking that the element's value contains any of the strings in _filters. The use of the null coalescing operator ensures a NullReferenceException isn't thrown when the itemtype node doesn't exist since it is replaced with an empty string.

The other approach is to use let and filter out the nulls:

var q = from sr in SearchResults.Descendants("Result")
        let itemtype = (string)sr.Element("itemtype")
        where itemtype != null &&
              _filters.Any(filter => itemtype.Contains(filter))
        orderby (string)sr.Element("ipitemtype") ascending
        select new SearchItem
        {
            //Create Object
            ID = (string)sr.Element("blabla")
        }

Note that String.Contains is case sensitive. So a check for "videos" won't match on "Videos" with a capital "V". To ignore case you can use String.IndexOf in this manner:

_filters.Any(filter => itemtype.IndexOf(filter, StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase) >= 0)
share|improve this answer
    
The issue I have with this is that <itemtype> may be empty occasionally if the items aren't tagged properly. If an element is empty, i.e. <itemtype />, .Value throws an exception, which is why I always case to string instead of relying on .Value. –  Wesley Jun 6 '11 at 21:01
    
@Wesley try the updated approach. This uses let to hold on to the explicit conversion result, which is then filtered out if it's null, then checked against the filter items. –  Ahmad Mageed Jun 6 '11 at 21:09
    
**EDIT I tried the approach and the Enumeration came out completely empty. Not true, it came out with some results, but not all. –  Wesley Jun 6 '11 at 21:21
    
@Wesley I added one more update at the bottom of my post before your comment was made. It's possible that either your filters or values contain mixed case. Use the IndexOf approach I outlined above to ignore the case of your filters and element values. If that doesn't work then the issue lies elsewhere. –  Ahmad Mageed Jun 6 '11 at 21:26
    
Ahmad, there was indeed a case problem that was part of poor code from another team. This has been fixed and all the XML has been set to lowercase. Your solution works, but someone else was a little faster and their code is a little cleaner, so I marked theirs as the answer. I will upvote though, you did a great job. –  Wesley Jun 6 '11 at 21:40
show 6 more comments

You are checking if the array _filters has an element with the value "videos mission critial document advertising" (which is not the case), rather than if "videos mission critial document advertising" contains any of the elements in _filters.

Try this:

where _filters.Any(filter => ((string)sr.Element("itemtype")).Contains(filter))
share|improve this answer
    
I don't think that's true, if the node <itemtype> contains a single value like <itemtype>videos</itemtype> then the Linq does return that node, not a string from _filters. –  Wesley Jun 6 '11 at 20:51
    
interesting. So I tried your code and now I have to opposite problem. Nodes that are just <itemtype>videos</itemtype> are being ignored, while nodes like <itemtype>marketing communications videos</itemtype> are being accepted. Truly confused. –  Wesley Jun 6 '11 at 21:12
    
I fixed a case problem in the XML and this works perfectly. –  Wesley Jun 6 '11 at 21:39
    
The use of Contains here would throw a NullReferenceException if the result is null. I've updated my response to handle this scenario. –  Ahmad Mageed Jun 6 '11 at 21:52
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The problem is that you are making false assumptions about the way the Contains method works. (Also see the String.Contains() documentation The contains method returns true if "a sequence contains a specific element". In the example you described, both the _filters array and the itemtype text contains the string videos, but neither contain each other. A more appropriate test would be to use the following extension method:

public static class ContainsAnyExtension
{
    public static bool ContainsAny<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable, params T[] elements)
    {
        if(enumerable == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("enumerable");
        if(!enumerable.Any() || elements.Length == 0) return false;
        foreach(var element in elements){
           if(enumerable.Contains(element)){
               return true;
           }
        }
        return false;
    }
}

So, your correct LINQ query would be:

var q = from sr in SearchResults.Descendants("Result")
        where ((string)sr.Element("itemtype")).ContainsAny(_filters)
        orderby ((string)sr.Element("ipitemtype")) ascending
        select new SearchItem
        {
            ID = sr.Element("blabla").Value
        };

It may also be helpful to review this post: How do I use LINQ Contains(string[]) instead of Contains(string), which is similar but specifically targets the String.Contains method instead of the Enumerable.Contains extension.

share|improve this answer
    
.ContainsAny is not an available option for me right now. I'm in Silverlight if that make a difference, but I checked to make sure my .NET framework was version 4. –  Wesley Jun 6 '11 at 20:56
    
@Wesley, what do you mean it is not available? I posted the code. Copy and paste it into your solution. –  smartcaveman Jun 6 '11 at 20:57
    
@smartcaveman this is an awful lot to go through when a simple LINQ statement can get the job done. –  Ahmad Mageed Jun 6 '11 at 21:01
    
I do, and ContainsAny shows "string does not contain a definition for ContainsAny". I'm looking into this now. –  Wesley Jun 6 '11 at 21:03
    
@Ahmad Mageed You meana separate LINQ statement. This is what I'm doing right now, but it seems silly to use two statements where one with a proper Where will do. –  Wesley Jun 6 '11 at 21:04
show 11 more comments

This answer had fundamental errors and has been replaced by my other one. Please ignore this post.

share|improve this answer
    
-1. XElement can be explicitly cast to string. This is actually preferable to using the Value property, because it doesn't throw an exception if the element does not exist. –  dtb Jun 6 '11 at 20:34
    
The reason I used (string) is because if the node is empty, i.e. <itemtype />, then .Value throws an exception. –  Wesley Jun 6 '11 at 20:49
    
@Wesley, I was mistaken about this, - I posted a new answer because this is wrong and am deleting this one. –  smartcaveman Jun 6 '11 at 20:51
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