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class A
{
    public virtual int one()
    {
        return 100;
    }

    public virtual int two()
    {
        return 200;
    }

    public virtual int three()
    {
        return this.one();
    }
}

class B : A
{ 
    public override int one()
    {
        return 300;
    }

    public override int two()
    {
        return this.one();
    }

    public override int three()
    {
        return base.three();
    }
}
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        A b = new B();
        Console.WriteLine(b.three());
    }
}

Why does this code return "300"?

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1  
Because "This ... is ... Sparta!". Kidding aside, that is what a virtual method should do. –  Marcelo Jun 6 '11 at 21:55

4 Answers 4

Because it's virtual.

The whole point of virtual methods is that you always call the overridden version.

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That is the definition of an override.

The virtual keyword basically means, "Subclasses can override this method".

The override keyword basically means, "My base class has a virtual method that I am redefining"

I think your confusion is because the this.one() is called from the class A. But, the this still refers to an instance of the class B, which is why the method on B is called.

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well i know what virtual does, and i know that base.three would call the three method in class A, but why does this.three in class A call the method one in class B? shouldn't it call the one method in class A? –  Olle OlssN Jun 6 '11 at 22:02
    
No. this refers to a specific instance. That instance has one overriden with B's implementation. –  recursive Jun 6 '11 at 22:04
    
okey! they clears everying up for me :D –  Olle OlssN Jun 6 '11 at 22:04

What @SLaks said.

But specifically, b.three() invokes B.three, which invokes A.three, which invokes B.one.

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i get the part untill A.three invokes B.one, i thought it would invoke A.one :S –  Olle OlssN Jun 6 '11 at 22:03
    
@Olle: Calling this.blah invokes blah based on the dynamic type of this. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 6 '11 at 22:05
    
yeah get it now, thanks for your help :) –  Olle OlssN Jun 6 '11 at 22:06

I think when you say return base.three(); in the overridden method you should acutaly be calling return this.three(); other wise you'll be accessing the base class which is A.

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That is intentional. Your suggestion would call itself and recurse endlessly. –  recursive Jun 6 '11 at 21:59
    
wouldn't that trigger a stackoverflow? –  Olle OlssN Jun 6 '11 at 22:00
    
Indeed, it would. –  recursive Jun 6 '11 at 22:04

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