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Is it possible to read the length of re.search's output?

For example:

import re

list=['lost','post','cross','help','cost']

for i in range(len(list)):
  output = re.search('os', list[i])

Can I read output length?

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Do not use regexps for simple string comparisons. Additionally, the proper way to iterate over a list is for item in list. Please read the Python Tutorial. –  ThiefMaster Jun 6 '11 at 22:36
    
Length of what, exactly? –  Cat Plus Plus Jun 6 '11 at 22:37
    
@ThiefMaster: I know that RE is too much for a simple substing, but re.search it's more fast than string.find for example becouse it stops at the first occurrence. If you've a lot of strings, I prefer to use an "abnormal" way, but obtain a time less. –  stdio Jun 6 '11 at 22:47
    
str.find also only searches for one occurence –  ThiefMaster Jun 7 '11 at 6:15
    
Oh yes? thanks :) I'm beginning with python. However I chose "if 'string' in list: #do something" –  stdio Jun 7 '11 at 19:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In this case, the output length will be the same as the input length, because you're searching for a specific substring. When you search in 'lost', the length of the match will be 2, because that's what the length of the search parameter is. Now if you want to differentiate between "found" and "not found", remember that re.search returns None if there is no match. If you really need the length, you can do this:

for i in range(len(list)):
    length = 2 if re.search('os', list[i]) else 0

I'd recommend using a more typical foreach loop though:

for item in list:
    length = 2 if re.search('os', item) else 0

And if all you're checking is whether one string appears inside another, well, you can use the in operator for that:

for item in list:
    length = 2 if 'os' in item else 0

Now, if you're looking for a more complex regex, you can retrieve group 0 from the match, which is the entire substring, and check the length of that:

for item in list:
    match = re.search('[aeiou]s', item)
    length = len(match.group(0)) if match else 0
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Now, I understand what return the length of re.search output...the length of the substring! I was confused and re.search is not what I need. –  stdio Jun 6 '11 at 22:53

First of all, assigning a new name to the built-in list is a really bad idea. Second, that's not a very Pythonic way to iterate over a list. All Python loops are for-each loops, so simply do:

word_list = ['lost','post','cross','help','cost']
for word in word_list:
    match = re.search("os", word)

That being said, you are probably looking for the start and end methods of a match, which tell you exactly where a given match begins in the text being searched, and where it ends.

word_list = ['lost','post','cross','help','cost']
for word in word_list:
    match = re.search("os", word)
    if match is not None:
        print match.start(), match.end()

Obviously, the difference will be the length. Given your list of words, this will print

1 3
1 3
2 4
1 3
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re.search() returns a match object which has a span method. This method returns two elements, the start position and the end position of the match.

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