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can anyone tell me what is wrong with this piece of code

int* x=new int(5) ;
int i =0;
int** y = new int*[i];
for(int j = 0 ;j<5 ; j++)
{
     y[i++]=x;
}
delete[] y;

the compiler always triggers a breakpoint when I delete y note that I don't want to delete the object "x" thanks

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What do you expect new int*[0] to do, exactly? –  Nemo Jun 6 '11 at 22:35
    
You have two loop iteration variables i and j, but you're only incrementing i. In fact, you're incrementing it twice. But really you shouldn't be using arrays: you want to use std::vector –  Lambdageek Jun 6 '11 at 22:36
    
I suppose the for loop goes over j, doesn't it? –  shuhalo Jun 6 '11 at 22:36
    
what do you mean by "triggers a breakpoint?" Also, y is set to size = 0. –  Kyle Jun 6 '11 at 22:36

5 Answers 5

int i =0;
int** y = new int*[i];

Well, you have just allocated an array of pointers to int that big enough to fit... zero elements. In your loop you are:

  1. Writing outside the bounds of your array (remember, zero elements...)
  2. Incrementing your loop counter twice for each iteration.
  3. Never using your loop variable j.
  4. Assigning the value of x to... every other element of y... that is outside the bounds of the array as previously mentioned.

I don't really know what you are trying to accomplish here. How about a bit more background? You are invoking undefined behavior by assigning outside the bounds of y, so anything can happen after that.

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1  
but y is a dynamic array of pointers so by changing the value of 'i' I am increasing the boundary of my array and I checked by the debugger that the value of x were assigned to y element. and I fixed the loops but the program crashes when I want to delete y not I assign it –  neoProgram Jun 6 '11 at 22:46
1  
@neoProgram: "by changing the value of 'i' I am increasing the boundary of my array" - No, you definitely are not. Arrays cannot change in size dynamically. They stay the same size that they were when they were allocated, i and y are not tied together in any sense. I think you need to study up a bit more on how arrays and pointers work in general. Your program could crash whenever because its behavior is undefined after you write outside the bounds of y. –  Ed S. Jun 6 '11 at 22:50
    
I actually don't know the number of values that y should be assigned to –  neoProgram Jun 6 '11 at 22:53
    
@neoProgram: You're missing the point... –  Ed S. Jun 6 '11 at 22:53
    
@neoProgram: If you "don't know" the number of elements you need in your array, you should start by determining that number. So that you "know" it. Until you determine the exact number of elements, you can't allocate your array. The array will not magically grow for you by itself. If you allocated an array of size 0 (which is exactly what you did), it will forever have size 0. –  AndreyT Jun 6 '11 at 22:57

When you initialized 'y' it has zero length since i is 0.

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Sorry I edited my code I forget to edit the counter j before posting –  neoProgram Jun 6 '11 at 22:43

That line

int* x=new int(5) ;

you probably meant to be

int* x=new int[5]; // square brackets

Then in

int i = 0;
int** y = new int*[i];

you allocate for 0 elements. And in the lop you probably mean to iterate over j, but do incrementation on i twice per loop iteration:

for(int j = 0 ;i<5 ; i++)
{
     y[i++]=x;
}

Also in that loop you set each element to point to the same 5 element array. I'm pretty sure you're actually want something along this:

int const M = 5;
int const N = 5;

int** y = new int*[M];
for(int j = 0; j<M ; j++)
{
     y[j] = new int[N];
}
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this is just a simple part of my code. but in my program I don't know the value of the y array so I used dynamic allocation so I can increase its size dynamically what is the problem with that? –  neoProgram Jun 6 '11 at 22:51
    
@neoProgram: The problem with that is that the language disagrees with your assumption. I'm not sure where you got that idea, but it is completely wrong. –  Ed S. Jun 6 '11 at 22:53
    
@neoProgram: Do you actually think that by incrementing i after allocating y its size would change. This is not how it works. i get's evaluated when y is allocated and then never looked at again, regarding access of y. What you actually need is some dynamic container like std::vector then. –  datenwolf Jun 7 '11 at 6:29

y is zero-length because when you initialize it i==0 so the breakpoint is when you access y[1] in the second loop. but this why increment twice i?

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Try out this:

int len = 5;
int* x=new int[len] ;
int** y = new int*[len];
int i =0;
for(int j = 0 ;j<len ; j++)
{
     y[i++]=x;
}
delete[] y;

you shouldn't use constants in your code, except when declaring alias-variables for it.

share|improve this answer
    
That's the format I used I edited my program but still wouldn't work –  neoProgram Jun 6 '11 at 22:44
    
This example, while fixing an error or two, still makes absolutely no sense. You declare x as a 5 element array, yet assign the address of the first element to every element in y. You may as well use j for indexing into y, i is pointless. The OP needs to tell us what he is trying to do with this code. –  Ed S. Jun 6 '11 at 22:47

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