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I am creating a minesweeper game in python 2.7. I have run into several problems when attempting to create the GUI. I have used a library called easyGUI (found here: http://easygui.sourceforge.net/) for some of the basic setup windows, but that is not my problem. The issue is with the actual minesweeper window itself. I am unsure as to how to put a flag when right-click or run my recursive 'location_reveal' function when left clicked on a space. The other issue is how to change the text on the button to signify how many bordering mines there are, and where the flags are each time the user makes a decision. I ran into a huge problem because I figured I could just destroy the window and recreate it with the updates each time, however that did not work either. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

from easygui import *
import random
import os
import Tkinter

def game_new():
    n = enterbox(msg='Enter your name.', title='Welcome new user!', strip=True)
    while n.strip() == "":
        n = enterbox(msg='Oops you forgot to enter a name!', title='Welcome new user!', strip=True)
    a = buttonbox(msg='Choose a game difficulty', title='Configuration', choices = ['Beginner','Intermediate','Expert','Custom'])
    if a[0] == 'B':
        return n, 9, 9, 10
    elif a[0] == 'I':
        return n, 16, 16, 40
    elif a[0] == 'E':
        return n, 30, 16, 99
    else:
        a,b,c = customconfigure()
        return n,a,b,c

def customconfigure():
    msg = "Minesweeper configuration:"
    title = "Settings"
    fieldNames = ["Width in mines (max 30):","Height in mines (max 20):","Mines:"]
    fieldValues = []  # we start with blanks for the values
    fieldValues = multenterbox(msg,title, fieldNames)
    while 1:
        if fieldValues == None: break
        errmsg = ""
        for i in range(len(fieldNames)):
            if fieldValues[i].strip() == "":
                errmsg += ('"%s" was left blank.\n\n' % fieldNames[i])
            elif not fieldValues[i].strip().isdigit:
                errmsg += ('"%s" must be an integer.\n\n' % fieldNames[i])
            elif i == 0 and not 3 <= int(fieldValues[i]) <= 30:
                errmsg += ('Width must be between 3 and 30 mines.\n\n')
            elif i == 1 and not 3 <= int(fieldValues[i]) <= 20:
                errmsg += ('Height must be between 3 and 20 mines.\n\n')
            elif i == 2 and not 1 <= int(fieldValues[i]) <= (int(fieldValues[0]) * int(fieldValues[1]) - 1):
                errmsg += ('Mines must be between 1 and ' + str(int(fieldValues[0]) * int(fieldValues[1]) - 1) + '\n\n')                
        if errmsg == "":
            break # no problems found
        fieldValues = multenterbox(errmsg, title, fieldNames, fieldValues)
    return int(fieldValues[0]),int(fieldValues[1]),int(fieldValues[2])

def inchk(s,m):
    if not s.isdigit:
        return False
    if 1 <= int(s) <= m:
        return True
    else:
        return False    

def move_get():
    user_x = raw_input("Enter the 'x' of the point you want to preform an action on: ")
    while not inchk(user_x,width):
        user_x = raw_input("Invalid selection. Enter a value for 'x': ")
    user_y = raw_input("Enter the 'y' of the point you want to preform an action on: ")
    while not inchk(user_y,height):
        user_y = raw_input("Invalid selection. Enter a value for 'y': ")
    return int(user_x), int(user_y)


def location_reveal(x,y):
    global field
    global showing    
    global symbol_mine
    if field[x][y] == symbol_mine:
        game_over()
    else:
        showing[x][y] = " " + str(field[x][y]) + " "
        if showing[x-1][y] == "     " and field[x-1][y] != symbol_mine:
            location_reveal(x-1,y)
        if showing[x+1][y] == "     " and field[x+1][y] != symbol_mine:
            location_reveal(x+1,y)        
        if showing[x][y+1] == "     " and field[x][y+1] != symbol_mine:
            location_reveal(x,y+1)
        if showing[x][y-1] == "     " and field[x][y-1] != symbol_mine:
            location_reveal(x,y-1)
    playing()

def location_chosen(s):
    global field
    global showing
    x = int(s[:s.index(":")]) + 1
    y = int(s[s.index(":")+1:]) + 1
    msg = "Choose an action to "
    choices = ["Reveal","Flag","Back"]
    reply = buttonbox(msg,choices=choices)
    field_hid.destroy
    if reply == "Back":
        playing()
    elif reply == "Flag":
        showing[x][y] = " F "
        playing()
    else:
        location_reveal(x,y)

def playing():
    global field
    global showing
    global width
    global height
    global symbol_mine
    win = False
    def k():
        field_hid.destroy()
    count_mine = 0
    count_flag = 0
    for x in field:
        count_mine += x.count(symbol_mine)
    for x in showing:
        count_flag += x.count(' F ')
    for x in range(1, width):
        for y in range(1, height):
            if field[x][y] == symbol_mine and showing[x][y] == ' F ':
                if count_mine == count_flag:
                    win = True                 
                else:
                    win = False
                    break               


    field_hid = Tkinter.Tk()    
    for x in range(width):
        for y in range(height):
            s = str(x) + ":" + str(y)
            t = showing[x+1][y+1]
            b = Tkinter.Button(field_hid, text = t, command = lambda s=s: location_chosen(s))
            #b.bind('<Button-1>', field_hid.destroy())
            b.pack()
            b.grid(row=x, column=y)
    Tkinter.mainloop()  

def main():
    global width
    global height
    global field
    global showing
    global symbol_mine
    user_name, width, height, mines = game_new()
    symbol_empty = ' '
    symbol_mine = 'M' 
    play = True

    #Creates field with empty spaces
    field = [[symbol_empty for h in range(width+2)] for w in range(height+2)]    #
    showing = [["     " for h in range(width+2)] for w in range(height+2)]

    # Randomly places mines on the field
    mines_placed = 0
    while mines_placed < mines:
        y = random.randint(1,width)#
        x = random.randint(1,height)#
        if field[x][y] == symbol_empty:
            field[x][y] = symbol_mine
            mines_placed += 1

    # Checks How many mines border each square
    for x in range(1,height+1):
        for y in range(1, width+1):
            if field[x][y] != symbol_mine:
                mines_touching = 0
                for x2 in range(x-1,x+2):
                    for y2 in range(y-1,y+2):
                        if field[x2][y2] == symbol_mine:
                            mines_touching += 1
                if mines_touching > 0:
                    field[x][y] = str(mines_touching)

    #Creates the playing field
    playing()

main()
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can change the text on a button with the configure method of the button (eg: b1.configure(text="whatever")). You do not need to recreate the whole window with each update. Just create the buttons once and change the text or image as needed.

For example, change your button definition to look like this:

b = Tkinter.Button(field_hid, text = t)
b.configure(command = lambda s=s, button=b: location_chosen(s,button))

Then, change the parameters of location_chosen to be like this:

def location_chosen(s,button):
    ...

Once you do that, the method location_chosen will be passed in a reference to the button that was clicked. You can then reconfigure that button to have whatever label or image you want by doing button.configure(...)

Of course, another way is to store the references in an array or dictionary. For example, you could add:

self.button[s] = b

That way you can reference button[s] when you need to refer to a specific button by x,y (eg: self.button["1:2"].configure(...))

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response. I tried using configure, however all my buttons have the same name: field_hid = Tkinter.Tk() for x in range(width): for y in range(height): s = str(x) + ":" + str(y) t = showing[x+1][y+1] b = Tkinter.Button(field_hid, text = t, command = lambda s=s: location_chosen(s)) #b.bind('<Button-1>', field_hid.destroy()) b.pack() b.grid(row=x, column=y) Tkinter.mainloop() –  Nick Delben Jun 6 '11 at 23:46
    
@Nick Delbin: you may reuse the same local variable, but each widget still is a separate entity. You just need to save a reference. I recommend a dictionary, with a two-tuple as a key. For example, self.button[(row,column)] = Tkinter.Button(...). Though, with the design you have you don't really need it because you can just pass the reference to the widget as a parameter to the callback (eg: b = Tkinter.button(...); b.configure(command=lambda button=b: ...)) –  Bryan Oakley Jun 7 '11 at 3:08
    
I am unsure as to what you mean by this, is there any way you could be more specific? I understand using configure, but how does it determine which button I wish to change the text on? –  Nick Delben Jun 7 '11 at 15:33
    
@Nick Delben: I've updated my answer to include an example showing how to pass the button reference to the callback. –  Bryan Oakley Jun 7 '11 at 17:40
    
Thanks for all the help. It didnt change the specif button when I passed it with the method you suggested, it changed the last button in the grid. –  Nick Delben Jun 8 '11 at 16:02

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