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I've been tasked with password-protecting a Java app with minimal concern for real security. So it seemed sensible to store username/password pairs in a text file and then encrypt it. For the encryption, it seemed appropriate to use XOR ciphers because they're easy and fast (remember--it just has to discourage the casual user, not be bulletproof).

I wrote all the appropriate Java, and then realized I needed a way to encrypt the config file. I wrote an additional method, but it was clunky to use more than once or twice (and seemed to only work for some inputs), so I decided it was best to write something in Python, to be played with at a REPL.

This is what I ended up with:

from itertools import izip, cycle

KEY = "stackoverflow"

def encrypt(text):
    return ''.join(chr(ord(x) ^ ord(y)) for (x,y) in izip(text,cycle(KEY)))

def decrypt(text):
    return encrypt(text)

def export(users, file):
    with open(file, "w") as f:
        for user, password in users.items():
            f.write(encrypt('"%s" "%s"'%(user, password)) + "\n")

def import_data(file):
    with open(file) as f:
        return [decrypt(i) for i in f.readlines()]

On the surface, it works:

>>> x = encrypt("Hello world!")
>>> x
';\x11\r\x0f\x04O\x01\n\x00\n\x08N'
>>> decrypt(x)
'Hello world!'

But then things start to fall apart:

>>> export({"foo" : "bar", "baz" : "quux", "spam" : "eggs"}, "users.dat")
>>> import_data("users.dat")
['"foo" "bar"e', '"baz" "quux"}', '"spam" "eggs"y']

And here's how vim reads it -

Vim rendition

And then:

>>> export({"what" : "not", "this" : "that", "admin_istrator" : "quux"}, "users2.dat")
>>> import_data("users2.dat")
['"thi', "k97$ma{~'l", '"what" "not"}', '"admin_istrator" "quux', '7~']

Vim:

Vim rendition of the second set

It occurred to me that I might be having a problem with a character's encrypted form being a newline, but as far as I see that doesn't explain the wacky behavior in the first example or all of the wacky behavior in the second one.

Regarding the newlines, my Plan B is to encrypt the entire file--newlines and all--and then slurp it back up, decrypt it, split it on "\n", and proceed with my line-based parsing.

Thanks in advance.


Update: Here's my implementation of Plan B (described two paragraphs ago).

def import2(file):
    with open(file) as f:
        return decrypt(f.read())

and then:

>>> export({"foo" : "bar", "this" : "that", "admin_istrator" : "letmein"}, "users2.dat")
>>> import2("users2.dat")
'"this" "that"y%smg&91uux!}"admin_istrator" "letmein"y'

Update Two: Binary.

[Code is the same as above, except that all opens are open(file, "rb") or open(file, "wb").]

>>> export({"foo" : "bar", "this" : "that", "admin_istrator" : "letmein"}, "users2.dat")
>>> import2("users2.dat")
'"this" "that"y%smg&91uux!}"admin_istrator" "letmein"y'
>>> import_data("users2.dat")
['"t', "k97$ma{~'", '"foo" "bar"', '"admin_istrator" "letmein"']

Final update: Base 64, other shenanigans.

def import2(file):
    with open(file, "rb") as f:
        return filter(str.strip, [decrypt(i) for i in f.readlines()])

where encrypt and decrypt encode in/decode base 64.

share|improve this question
    
Why not just encode the username and passwords into binary and swap the bits (0 <-> 1)? If you don't care about security, that would deter all copy & paste password breaking script kiddies. –  Blender Jun 6 '11 at 23:36
    
Huh, I guess that's a good point. (But now I'm curious in general about my XOR problems!) I'll wait a day or so to see if anyone comes up with a proper solution. If that doesn't work, I'll just not the bitstrings, as you said. –  tsm Jun 6 '11 at 23:41
    
You could simplify your life re: @mu and newlines by base64 encoding the encrypted result. –  Ben Jackson Jun 6 '11 at 23:52
    
@mu I am not a Unicode expert, but doesn't Python 2 keep things in ASCII unless explicitly told otherwise? So it shouldn't be a factor? (In the long run, I will have to deal with Unicode, but that'll be a job for Java.) –  tsm Jun 7 '11 at 0:18
    
"password-protecting a Java app with minimal concern for real security" That's silly. "Real Security" (i.e., a hashed password) is simpler than the algorithm you've shown. Why not simply use an already-available hash function? –  S.Lott Jun 7 '11 at 2:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are trying to store binary in text mode file. Use open(file, "wb") for writing and open(file, "rb") for reading to open file in binary mode and fix an issue.

In text mode every "\r", "\n" and "\r\n" sequences are treated as newlines so they are converted into your local OS line ending convention ("\r\n" for Windows, "\n" for Unix, "\r" for old Macs). In case you read them from text file, you will always get "\n" instead, in case you write them, I don't remember actual behavior, but you will surely also get mess instead of your data :)

And with XOR encryption it's very likely you'll run into this kind of stuff :)

If you are forced not to use binary files, try base64 encoding (e.g. "some\0te\n\nxt with bi\x01naries".encode('base64')). To decode use .decode (thanks, Captain Obvious!).

share|improve this answer
    
I just tried that (for code/output see the OP). Unfortunately it didn't affect anything. –  tsm Jun 7 '11 at 0:03
    
*Previous comment was about binary. The base 64 stuff worked after some tweaking (for whatever reason an extra newline was inserted between each entry, so as you can see above I had to play some filtering tricks. But it works! Thanks! Hopefully porting it to Java is straightforward. –  tsm Jun 7 '11 at 0:36

The problem is you are not reading the same data you codified (you add a '\n' after the encryption), just do a rstrip() of the data you read:

  def import_data(file):
    with open(file) as f:
       return [decrypt(i.rstrip()) for i in f.readlines()]
share|improve this answer
1  
The problem is that his encryption can also produce newlines which need yet different explicit handling. I agree with @mu's comment that character encoding issues may burn him if he treats the file as text. –  Ben Jackson Jun 6 '11 at 23:52
    
I actually used to have an i.strip() in there (today I learned about rstrip) but talked myself into thinking I was crazy for wanting it. Sigh. Adding the rstrip made {"foo" : "bar", "this" : "that", "admin_istrator" : "letmein"} => ['"t', "k97$ma{~'", '"foo" "bar"', '"admin_istrator" "letmein"']. Now I'm off to make the encryption/decryption happen for the entire file, not each line individually. –  tsm Jun 6 '11 at 23:55
    
@Ben you are right, I didn't saw @mu's comment. Might this be remedied by simply writing and reading the file as a whole instead of a line at a time? –  Fido Jun 7 '11 at 0:00
    
@Tim, wow that's odd, I tried it at home and it produced the right output... Damn you character encoding! =P –  Fido Jun 7 '11 at 0:03
    
(Ben, I hadn't seen your comment when I wrote mine.) Even treating the file as one big chunk (and not giving newlines special treatment) is producing problems. I agree with Fido re. character encoding! I'm now investigating base64 encoding. –  tsm Jun 7 '11 at 0:07

You can fix it by encrypting the newlines and not resetting the key between lines

from itertools import izip, cycle

KEY = "stackoverflow"

def encrypt(text):
    return ''.join(chr(ord(x) ^ ord(y)) for (x,y) in izip(text,key))

def decrypt(text):
    return encrypt(text)

def export(users, file):
    with open(file, "w") as f:
        for user, password in users.items():
            f.write(encrypt('"%s" "%s"\n'%(user, password)))

def import_data(file):
    with open(file) as f:
        return [decrypt(i) for i in f]


key = cycle(KEY)
export({"foo" : "bar", "baz" : "quux", "spam" : "eggs"}, "users.dat")

key = cycle(KEY)
for row in import_data("users.dat"):
    print row

This should be turned into a class, and key would be an instance variable instead of a global as it is here

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