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I'm trying to ignore IE7 and IE8 but am having a tiny bit of trouble getting the operators to work properly.

<?php 
    if(stristr(strtolower($_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT']), "msie 8") && (strtolower($_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT']), "msie 7") == false ){
    echo "<script type=\"text/javascript\"> 
       $(document).ready(function() {
        // ok
        });
    </script>";
}?>

My other option gives me no errors but is not functioning properly:

<?php 
    if(stristr(strtolower($_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT']), "msie 8" || ($_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT']), "msie 7") == FALSE){
    echo "<script type=\"text/javascript\"> 
       $(document).ready(function() {
        // OK
        });
    </script>";
}?>
share|improve this question
    
Why would you want to ingore almost half of internet users? – Mārtiņš Briedis Jun 6 '11 at 23:57
    
(Also FYI server errors will have nothing to do with cross-browser compatibility.) – Ben Jun 6 '11 at 23:58
    
Have no fear friend... it's nothing that hinders functionality. Any ideas on my misuse of PHP? – klav Jun 6 '11 at 23:59
1  
strtolower is redundant if you use stristr checks. – mario Jun 7 '11 at 0:03
    
Yep! I'm aware of what's causing the server error. Thanks! – klav Jun 7 '11 at 0:04
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I'm guessing you mean you want to only print the code inside the if if it's not IE7/IE8.

In this case, you need:

<?php 
    if( (stristr($_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT'], "msie 8") === FALSE) && 
        (stristr($_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT'], "msie 7") === FALSE) ) {
        echo "<script type=\"text/javascript\"> 
            $(document).ready(function() {
            // ok
            });
            </script>";
    }
?>

You were missing the second call to stristr. Also as mentioned by cHao, you need to check for strict equality (types as well) and strtolower is unnecessary. Even if it somehow works out that strict equality isn't really necessary, using strict checks helps you remember and makes it clear in the code what is going on.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you MGwynne. That is exactly it. Thanks a million! – klav Jun 7 '11 at 0:07
1  
I'm having some images shown on hover and they are PNG's. Of course IE7 and IE8 dislike rendering PNG's via fadeIn() so I must exclude both. – klav Jun 7 '11 at 0:10

!$_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT'] looks wrong. It'd try to negate a string -- which would give you a boolean, whose value can never contain 'MSIE' (because its only possible values are zero (false) and 1 (true).

You may want to move the ! to before the stristr.

Now realize that stristr will take one set of operands (the user-agent string and "MSIE 8"). In order to test for the second string, you'll need a second stristr, like so:

<?php 
    if(!stristr($_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT'], "msie 8") &&
       !stristr($_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT'], "msie 7"))
    {
        echo "<script type=\"text/javascript\"> 
            $(document).ready(function() {
                // OK
            });
            </script>
        ";
    }
?>

Note, you don't need strtolower at all, since you're using stristr (which is case insensitive).

share|improve this answer
    
Opps sorry, that my error. Original code has been replaced. Does not work as intended with current code. – klav Jun 7 '11 at 0:04
    
I agree and this is not the only thoughtlessness in the Klav's code: using strtolower() within stristr() is pointless since stristr() is cas insensitive. And also: the result of stristr() is not strictly tested, i.e. ( stristr(...)!==false ). And also stristr() is not exactly testing the presence if a substring... – Skrol29 Jun 7 '11 at 0:08
    
@Skrol29: Yeah, i'd noticed the strtolower thing while i was editing too. Added to the answer. :) The value doesn't need to be strictly tested, though, as if it's not blank, 0, or null, it will be true. And since the string's going to start with "msie" if the substring exists, it'll always be true and won't be a number. But yeah, stripos might be better (along with an explicit test for !== false, but in practice no user-agent string starts with "msie"). – cHao Jun 7 '11 at 0:15

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