Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am building a control depicting a diagram. The control's content (which is rather complex) will try to scale to fit allotted space to the extent possible. However, not all scales are valid. The content cannot shrink indefinitely. E.g. a box on a diagram should be at least 20 pixels wide. Thus, when the window is too small to fit the content even at the minimum size, scaling should stop and scroll bars must appear.

I cannot find an elegant solution for this in WPF. Any design ideas are greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Set the Horizontal & VerticalAlignment of the content to Stretch but also set the MinWidth and MinHeight to appropriate values, place your content in a ScrollViewer whose Horizontal & VerticalScrollBarVisibility is set to Auto.

That should work, probably...

Example for your XAML on-the-fly viewer of choice (e.g. Kaxaml):

<Window xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation" xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml">
    <ScrollViewer HorizontalScrollBarVisibility="Auto" VerticalScrollBarVisibility="Auto">
        <Button
            MinHeight="400"
            MinWidth="400"
            HorizontalAlignment="Stretch"
            VerticalAlignment="Stretch"
            Content="Buttons!"/>
    </ScrollViewer>
</Window>
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, you understood my question just right. I cannot use your example directly, since I have Panels and some measurement involved, but your answer made me realize this: when your panel is in a scroll viewer, upon measurement you calculate minimum possible size that lets you survive, while upon arrangement you use up the space provided. Thus, you calculate your layout twice. Seems obvious ones it's stated, but I did not get it the first time. Thanks! –  Ivan Krivyakov Jun 7 '11 at 2:32
    
Glad it helped :) There are some interesting articles on MSDN by the way, e.g. Layout System & Panels Overview. –  H.B. Jun 7 '11 at 2:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.