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In my application, a user enters two dates. A scheduled start date, and a scheduled end date. We have to take those dates, and populate 4 fields, based on the difference.

So, lets say he selects 1st Jan, 2010 as a start, and 2nd of March, 2011 as the end, we need to end up with:

Years: 1 Months: 2 Weeks: 0 Days 1

Meaning the total duration is 1 year, 2 months and 1 day.

Is there a standard way of doing this? Or would I need to write a method that has a lot of pretty tricky logic to work it out? I was hoping I'd be lucky, and there would be a date-diff type .Net class available.

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You're not getting the answers you want, so here's the T-SQL version: stackoverflow.com/questions/57599/… –  Gabe Jun 7 '11 at 3:48
    
This link has the answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/1083955/… –  Steve Wellens Jun 7 '11 at 3:48
    
1  
possible duplicate of How to get difference between two dates in Year/Month/Week/Day? –  marc_s Jun 7 '11 at 5:06
    
I am Posted This Topic code stackoverflow.com/questions/6260372/… –  Shaik Raffi Nov 6 '13 at 8:34

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I think TimeSpan is what you are looking for, but it does not do years or months because those vary in length.

The below example is from the above link;

// Define two dates.
DateTime date1 = new DateTime(2010, 1, 1, 8, 0, 15);
DateTime date2 = new DateTime(2010, 8, 18, 13, 30, 30);
// Calculate the interval between the two dates.
TimeSpan interval = date2 - date1;
Console.WriteLine("{0} - {1} = {2}", date2, date1, interval.ToString());
// Display individual properties of the resulting TimeSpan object.
Console.WriteLine("   {0,-35} {1,20}", "Value of Days Component:", interval.Days);
Console.WriteLine("   {0,-35} {1,20}", "Total Number of Days:", interval.TotalDays);
Console.WriteLine("   {0,-35} {1,20}", "Value of Hours Component:", interval.Hours);
Console.WriteLine("   {0,-35} {1,20}", "Total Number of Hours:", interval.TotalHours);
Console.WriteLine("   {0,-35} {1,20}", "Value of Minutes Component:", interval.Minutes);
Console.WriteLine("   {0,-35} {1,20}", "Total Number of Minutes:", interval.TotalMinutes);
Console.WriteLine("   {0,-35} {1,20:N0}", "Value of Seconds Component:", interval.Seconds);
Console.WriteLine("   {0,-35} {1,20:N0}", "Total Number of Seconds:", interval.TotalSeconds);
Console.WriteLine("   {0,-35} {1,20:N0}", "Value of Milliseconds Component:", interval.Milliseconds);
Console.WriteLine("   {0,-35} {1,20:N0}", "Total Number of Milliseconds:", interval.TotalMilliseconds);
Console.WriteLine("   {0,-35} {1,20:N0}", "Ticks:", interval.Ticks);
// the example displays the following output:
//       8/18/2010 1:30:30 PM - 1/1/2010 8:00:15 AM = 229.05:30:15
//          Value of Days Component:                             229
//          Total Number of Days:                   229.229340277778
//          Value of Hours Component:                              5
//          Total Number of Hours:                  5501.50416666667
//          Value of Minutes Component:                           30
//          Total Number of Minutes:                       330090.25
//          Value of Seconds Component:                           15
//          Total Number of Seconds:                      19,805,415
//          Value of Milliseconds Component:                       0
//          Total Number of Milliseconds:             19,805,415,000
//          Ticks:                               198,054,150,000,000
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That only seems to handle time values... maximum being Hours. –  Craig Jun 7 '11 at 3:53
5  
Why does this get upvotes? This solution does not answer the question. I don't see years, months, weeks and days. –  Alex Aza Jun 7 '11 at 3:58
    
I like the answer I think TimeSpan is what you are looking for, but it doesn't do what you asked for :) –  Alex Aza Jun 7 '11 at 4:00
    
As Steve W. pointed out stackoverflow.com/questions/1083955/… has an accepted answer. However that answers also doesn't fully answer the question, but shows the complexities involved in this sort of calculation. And it does answer the question "Is there a standard way of doing this? Or would I need to write a method that has a lot of pretty tricky logic to work it out?" –  Christopherous 5000 Jun 7 '11 at 13:32

You can use the DateDiff class of this free library:

// ----------------------------------------------------------------------
public void DateDiffSample()
{
  DateTime date1 = new DateTime( 2009, 11, 8, 7, 13, 59 );
  Console.WriteLine( "Date1: {0}", date1 );
  // > Date1: 08.11.2009 07:13:59
  DateTime date2 = new DateTime( 2011, 3, 20, 19, 55, 28 );
  Console.WriteLine( "Date2: {0}", date2 );
  // > Date2: 20.03.2011 19:55:28

  DateDiff dateDiff = new DateDiff( date1, date2 );

  // differences
  Console.WriteLine( "DateDiff.Years: {0}", dateDiff.Years );
  // > DateDiff.Years: 1
  Console.WriteLine( "DateDiff.Quarters: {0}", dateDiff.Quarters );
  // > DateDiff.Quarters: 5
  Console.WriteLine( "DateDiff.Months: {0}", dateDiff.Months );
  // > DateDiff.Months: 16
  Console.WriteLine( "DateDiff.Weeks: {0}", dateDiff.Weeks );
  // > DateDiff.Weeks: 70
  Console.WriteLine( "DateDiff.Days: {0}", dateDiff.Days );
  // > DateDiff.Days: 497
  Console.WriteLine( "DateDiff.Weekdays: {0}", dateDiff.Weekdays );
  // > DateDiff.Weekdays: 71
  Console.WriteLine( "DateDiff.Hours: {0}", dateDiff.Hours );
  // > DateDiff.Hours: 11940
  Console.WriteLine( "DateDiff.Minutes: {0}", dateDiff.Minutes );
  // > DateDiff.Minutes: 716441
  Console.WriteLine( "DateDiff.Seconds: {0}", dateDiff.Seconds );
  // > DateDiff.Seconds: 42986489

  // elapsed
  Console.WriteLine( "DateDiff.ElapsedYears: {0}", dateDiff.ElapsedYears );
  // > DateDiff.ElapsedYears: 1
  Console.WriteLine( "DateDiff.ElapsedMonths: {0}", dateDiff.ElapsedMonths );
  // > DateDiff.ElapsedMonths: 4
  Console.WriteLine( "DateDiff.ElapsedDays: {0}", dateDiff.ElapsedDays );
  // > DateDiff.ElapsedDays: 12
  Console.WriteLine( "DateDiff.ElapsedHours: {0}", dateDiff.ElapsedHours );
  // > DateDiff.ElapsedHours: 12
  Console.WriteLine( "DateDiff.ElapsedMinutes: {0}", dateDiff.ElapsedMinutes );
  // > DateDiff.ElapsedMinutes: 41
  Console.WriteLine( "DateDiff.ElapsedSeconds: {0}", dateDiff.ElapsedSeconds );
  // > DateDiff.ElapsedSeconds: 29
} // DateDiffSample
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Heres a complete method, weeks are not included, but could be added relatively simply. It's a somewhat complex question (asked in a multitude of ways on stackoverflow and answered poorly in a multitude of ways), but none the less can be answered. The TimeSpan object gives us part of what we need, but only works up through days. I've written a significant number of tests against this method, if you find a hole, please post a comment.

What this will do is compare 2 dates, getting the years, months, days, hours, and minutes. (e.g. some event happened 1 year, 6 months, 3 days, 4 hours and 7 minutes ago)

Because this question has been asked and attempted to be answered so many times, I'm not sure this will ever even get noticed, but if so it should provide value.

    public static void TimeSpanToDateParts(DateTime d1, DateTime d2, out int years, out int months, out int days, out int hours, out int minutes)
    {
        if (d1 < d2)
        {
            var d3 = d2;
            d2 = d1;
            d1 = d3;
        }

        var span = d1 - d2;

        months = 12 * (d1.Year - d2.Year) + (d1.Month - d2.Month);

        //month may need to be decremented because the above calculates the ceiling of the months, not the floor.
        //to do so we increase d2 by the same number of months and compare.
        //(500ms fudge factor because datetimes are not precise enough to compare exactly)
        if (d1.CompareTo(d2.AddMonths(months).AddMilliseconds(-500)) <= 0)
        {
            --months;
        }

        years = months / 12;
        months -= years * 12;

        if (months == 0 && years == 0)
        {
            days = span.Days;
        }
        else
        {
            var md1 = new DateTime(d1.Year, d1.Month, d1.Day);
            var md2 = new DateTime(d2.Year, d2.Month, d1.Day);
            var mDays = (int) (md1 - md2).TotalDays;

            if (mDays > span.Days)
            {
                mDays = (int)(md1.AddMonths(-1) - md2).TotalDays;
            }

            days = span.Days - mDays;


        }
        hours = span.Hours;
        minutes = span.Minutes;
    }
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Investigate the C# TimeSpan structure. It doesn't do months or years, but it does do days. That makes things easier.

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 public partial class Age1 : System.Web.UI.Page
    {
        private int Years;
        private int Months;
        private int Days;
        DateTime Cday;
        DateTime Bday;


        protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            txtCurrentDate.Enabled = false;
            txtCurrentDate.Text = DateTime.Now.ToString("g");
            Cday = Convert.ToDateTime(txtCurrentDate.Text);
        }

        protected void Button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            Bday = Convert.ToDateTime(txtBirthdate.Text);
            AgeCaluclation(Bday, Cday);
            txtBirthdate.Text = "";
            txtCurrentDate.Text = "";
            lblAge.Text = this.Years+"  Years "+this.Months+"  Months " +this.Days+ "Days";
        }

        private Age1 AgeCaluclation(DateTime Bday, DateTime Cday)
        {

            if ((Cday.Year - Bday.Year) > 0 || 
               (((Cday.Year - Bday.Year) == 0) && 
               ((Bday.Month < Cday.Month) ||
               ((Bday.Month == Cday.Month) && 
               (Bday.Day <= Cday.Day)))))
            {

                int DaysInBdayMonth = DateTime.DaysInMonth(Bday.Year, Bday.Month);
                int DaysRemain = Cday.Day + (DaysInBdayMonth - Bday.Day);

                    if(Cday.Month > Bday.Month)
                    {
                        this.Years = Cday.Year - Bday.Year;
                        this.Months = Cday.Month - (Bday.Month + 1) + Math.Abs(DaysRemain / DaysInBdayMonth);
                        this.Days = (DaysRemain % DaysInBdayMonth + DaysInBdayMonth) % DaysInBdayMonth;
                    }
                    else if (Cday.Month == Bday.Month)
                    {
                        if (Cday.Day >= Bday.Day)
                        {
                            this.Years = Cday.Year - Bday.Year;
                            this.Months = 0;
                            this.Days = Cday.Day - Bday.Day;
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            this.Years = (Cday.Year - 1) - Bday.Year;
                            this.Months = 11;
                            this.Days = DateTime.DaysInMonth(Bday.Year, Bday.Month) - (Bday.Day - Cday.Day);

                        }
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        this.Years = (Cday.Year - 1) - Bday.Year;
                        this.Months = Cday.Month + (11 - Bday.Month) + Math.Abs(DaysRemain / DaysInBdayMonth);
                        this.Days = (DaysRemain % DaysInBdayMonth + DaysInBdayMonth) % DaysInBdayMonth;
                    }
            }
            else
            {
                throw new ArgumentException("Birthday date must be earlier than current date");
            }
            return this;
        }

    }

AgeCaluclationUsingC# and Asp.net Amazing

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