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The Coded UI Test Builder application in Visual Studio is very useful when hand-writing Coded UI Tests. It has an 'inspector' type tool that shows properties for a selected control, which makes searching for the control very simple.

At the moment the only way I am able to launch this tool is by going through the 'add new Coded UI Test' wizard. This launches fine, however it

  • creates a new empty coded UI test
  • closes down when I next run a test or start debugging in Visual Studio

Has anyone advice on how to launch the tool without adding a new Coded UI Test? Any other suggestions around inspecting controls with a hand-written Coded UI Test? I'm working in WPF if it makes any difference.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

With a class like this one, right clicking inside the test method should give you a "Generate Code for Coded UI Test" -> "Use Coded UI Test Builder" option. It will still minimize Visual Studio, but it shouldn't create a new test method. There is also a keyboard shortcut: CTRL+\, CTRL+C

[CodedUITest]
public class MyUITests
{
    public MyUITests()
    {
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void StartMyTest()
    {
        //right click in here to get the context menu option
    }
}
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Perfect, thanks! –  Kirk Broadhurst Jun 7 '11 at 23:58
1  
You can also right click on the uitest file in Solution Explorer –  EdmundYeung99 Jul 28 '11 at 2:10
  1. You can open Visual Studio command prompt
  2. execute "codedUITestBuilder.exe /standalone"
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You can also right click the UIMap.uitest file in Solution Explorer and select "Edit with Coded UI Test Builder" No need for a Coded UI Test this way

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I found the UIMap / 'recorded test' pattern didn't work very well at all. It wasn't able to find my dynamically generated controls and missed too many steps. –  Kirk Broadhurst Oct 7 '11 at 4:18

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