Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have 2 tables: T1 and T2, they are existing tables with data. We have a one to many relationship between T1 and T2. How do I alter the table definitions to perform cascading delete in SQL Server when a record from T1 is deleted, all associated records in T2 also deleted. The foreign constraint is in place between them. I don't want to drop the tables or create a trigger to do the deletion for T2. For example, when I delete an employee, all the review record should be gone, too.

T1 - Employee

Employee ID      
Name
Status

T2 - Performance Reviews

Employee ID - 2009 Review
Employee ID - 2010 Review
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

You will need to

  • drop the existing foreign key constraint
  • add a new one with the ON DELETE CASCADE setting enabled

Something like:

ALTER TABLE dbo.T2
   DROP CONSTRAINT FK_T1_T2   -- or whatever it's called

ALTER TABLE dbo.T2
   ADD CONSTRAINT FK_T1_T2_Cascade
   FOREIGN KEY (EmployeeID) REFERENCES dbo.T1(EmployeeID) ON DELETE CASCADE
share|improve this answer

Use something like

ALTER TABLE T2
ADD CONSTRAINT fk_employee
FOREIGN KEY (employeeID)
REFERENCES T1 (employeeID)
ON DELETE CASCADE;

Fill in the correct column names and you should be set. As mark_s correctly stated, if you have already a foreign key constraint in place, you maybe need to delete the old one first and then create the new one.

share|improve this answer
2  
You cannot just add a new FK constraint if there's one in place already (as the OP says there is); you will need to delete the existing one first –  marc_s Jun 7 '11 at 5:10
1  
@marc_s Thank you. I edited my answer. –  Hyperboreus Jun 7 '11 at 5:15
21  
@marc_s - actually, you can add a second foreign key against exactly the same columns on both sides, and it will work correctly. If working in a production environment with no downtime, it may be preferable to introduce the new FK with cascade, and then drop the older FK, rather than leave a window on the table when no FK is in place. (Just tested on SQL 2008) –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jun 7 '11 at 7:50
    
This is correct. I tried this, and it works. There is no need to drop the first foreign key constraints. Thanks for the reply. –  Bichvan Nguyen Jun 8 '11 at 3:39

First To Enable ONCascade property:

1.Drop the existing foreign key constraint

2.add a new one with the ON DELETE CASCADE setting enabled

Ex: IF EXISTS(SELECT 1 FROM sys.foreign_keys WHERE parent_object_id = OBJECT_ID(N'dbo.Response')) BEGIN

ALTER TABLE [dbo].[Response] DROP CONSTRAINT [FK_Response_Request]

ALTER TABLE [dbo].[Response] WITH CHECK ADD CONSTRAINT [FK_Response_Request] FOREIGN KEY([RequestId]) REFERENCES [dbo].[Request] ([RequestId]) ON DELETE CASCADE END

ELSE

BEGIN ALTER TABLE [dbo].[Response] WITH CHECK ADD CONSTRAINT [FK_Response_Request] FOREIGN KEY([RequestId]) REFERENCES [dbo].[Request] ([RequestId]) ON DELETE CASCADE END

Second To Disable ONCascade property:

1.Drop the existing foreign key constraint

2.Add a new one with the ON DELETE NO ACTION setting enabled

Ex: IF EXISTS(SELECT 1 FROM sys.foreign_keys WHERE parent_object_id = OBJECT_ID(N'dbo.Response')) BEGIN ALTER TABLE [dbo].[Response] DROP CONSTRAINT [FK_Response_Request]

ALTER TABLE [dbo].[Response] WITH CHECK ADD CONSTRAINT [FK_Response_Request] FOREIGN KEY([RequestId]) REFERENCES [dbo].[Request] ([RequestId]) ON DELETE CASCADE END

ELSE

BEGIN ALTER TABLE [dbo].[Response] WITH CHECK ADD CONSTRAINT [FK_Response_Request] FOREIGN KEY([RequestId]) REFERENCES [dbo].[Request] ([RequestId]) ON DELETE NO ACTION END

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.