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I have an object hierarchy arranged as Continents > Countries > Cities. Am able to select all the cities in a specific "country" as below. What I am looking for is a way to merge these two queries, and arrive at the cityList in a single query.

var cities = network.Continents
    .SelectMany(continent => continent.Countries)
    .Where(ctry => ctry.Id == "country")
    .SelectMany(ctry => ctry.Cities);

List<City> cityList = (from c in cities
                        select new City { Id = c.Id, Name = c.Name }).ToList<City>();

The "c in cities" have a different structure from the one in cityList and hence the mapping in the second query.

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Found an answer in a related question here: link code .Select(city => new City() { Id = city.Id, Name = city.Name }).ToList<City>(); –  fozylet Jun 7 '11 at 6:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Just use dot notation in your query:

var cities = network.Continents
    .SelectMany(continent => continent.Countries)
    .Where(ctry => ctry.Id == "country")
    .SelectMany(ctry => ctry.Cities)
    .Select(cty=> new City{Id = cty.Id, Name = cty.Name }).ToList<City>();

I think it's readable, and it doesn't have extra overhead, generated sql query is similar in most cases you can do this, So just readability is important.

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Thank you. I've made changes as per this, since this fits my idea of readability too. –  fozylet Jun 7 '11 at 6:20

You should be able to do just this:

var cityList = network.Continents
    .SelectMany(continent => continent.Countries)
    .Where(ctry => ctry.Id == "country")
    .SelectMany(ctry =>
        ctry.Cities.Select(c => new City { Id = c.Id, Name = c.Name })
    ).ToList();

Alternatively:

var cityList =
    (from continent in network.Continents
     from country in continent.Countries
     where country.Id == "country"
     from city in country.Cities
     select new City { Id = city.Id, Name = city.Name })
    .ToList();
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Thank you for the answer –  fozylet Jun 7 '11 at 6:40

Another alternative to the options posted:

var cityList = network.Continents
                      .SelectMany(continent => continent.Countries)
                      .Where(ctry => ctry.Id == "country")
                      .SelectMany(ctry =>  ctry.Cities,
                                  c => new City { Id = c.Id, Name = c.Name })
                      .ToList();

This overload of SelectMany (in the second call) is the one used by the C# compiler in query expressions. Note that if you want to write it as a query expression, you can do so easily:

var cityList = (from continent in network.Continents
                from country in continent.Countries
                where country.Id == "country"
                from city in country.Cities
                select new City { Id = city.Id, Name = city.Name }).ToList(); 

In LINQ to Objects the query expression will be slightly less efficient than the dot notation form in this particular case, because the continent and country range variables will be propagated down to the select clause... but I'd expect the SQL generated by any database LINQ provider to be the same, and even within LINQ to Objects the difference is likely to be negligible.

Note that you don't need to specify the type argument when calling ToList - the type will be inferred as City already.

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Interesting variation. Thank you for posting. –  fozylet Jun 7 '11 at 6:29

Try the following:

var cities = 
    from continent in network.Continents
    from country in continent.Countries
    from city in country.Cities
    where country.Id = "country"
    select new City { Id = c.Id, Name = c.Name };
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Thank you for the answer. Was looking for dot notation as am more comfortable with that. –  fozylet Jun 7 '11 at 6:24

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