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Here is a test case I've created for a problem I found out.

For some reason the dict() 'l' in B() does not seem to hold the correct value. See the output below on my Linux 11.04 Ubuntu, python 2.7.1+.

class A():
    name = None
    b = None
    def __init__(self, name, bname, cname, dname):
        self.name = name
        print "A: name", name
        self.b = B(name, bname, cname, dname)
        print "A self.b:", self.b

class B():
    name = None
    l = dict()
    c = None
    def __init__(self, name, bname, cname, dname):
        self.aname = name
        self.name = bname
        print " B: name", bname
        self.c = C(bname, cname, dname)
        self.l["bb"] = self.c
        print " B self:", self
        print " B self.c:", self.c
        print " B self.l[bb]:", self.l["bb"], "<<< OK >>>"

    def dump(self):
        print " A: name", self.aname
        print " B: name", self.name
        for i in self.l:
            print " B: i=", i, "self.l[i]", self.l[i], "<<< ERROR >>>"

class C():
    name = None
    l = dict()
    d = None
    def __init__(self, bname, cname, dname):
        self.bname = bname
        self.cname = cname
        print "  B: name", bname
        print "  C: name", cname
        print "  C self:", self

    def dump(self):
        print "  B name:", self.bname
        print "  C name:", self.cname

a1 = A("a1", "b1", "c1", "d1")
a2 = A("a2", "b2", "c2", "d2")
a3 = A("a3", "b3", "c3", "d3")

a1.b.dump()
a1.b.c.dump()
a2.b.dump()
a2.b.c.dump()
a3.b.dump()
a3.b.c.dump()

Output on my machine:

    $ python bedntest.py 
A: name a1
 B: name b1
  B: name b1
  C: name c1
  C self: <__main__.C instance at 0xb76f3a6c>
 B self: <__main__.B instance at 0xb76f388c>
 B self.c: <__main__.C instance at 0xb76f3a6c>
 B self.l[bb]: <__main__.C instance at 0xb76f3a6c> <<< OK >>>
A self.b: <__main__.B instance at 0xb76f388c>
A: name a2
 B: name b2
  B: name b2
  C: name c2
  C self: <__main__.C instance at 0xb76f3acc>
 B self: <__main__.B instance at 0xb76f3aac>
 B self.c: <__main__.C instance at 0xb76f3acc>
 B self.l[bb]: <__main__.C instance at 0xb76f3acc> <<< OK >>>
A self.b: <__main__.B instance at 0xb76f3aac>
A: name a3
 B: name b3
  B: name b3
  C: name c3
  C self: <__main__.C instance at 0xb76f3b2c>
 B self: <__main__.B instance at 0xb76f3b0c>
 B self.c: <__main__.C instance at 0xb76f3b2c>
 B self.l[bb]: <__main__.C instance at 0xb76f3b2c> <<< OK >>>
A self.b: <__main__.B instance at 0xb76f3b0c>
 A: name a1
 B: name b1
 B: i= bb self.l[i] <__main__.C instance at 0xb76f3b2c> <<< ERROR >>>
  B name: b1
  C name: c1
 A: name a2
 B: name b2
 B: i= bb self.l[i] <__main__.C instance at 0xb76f3b2c> <<< ERROR >>>
  B name: b2
  C name: c2
 A: name a3
 B: name b3
 B: i= bb self.l[i] <__main__.C instance at 0xb76f3b2c> <<< ERROR >>>
  B name: b3
  C name: c3

To my understanding, the lines above:

B: i= bb self.l[i] <__main__.C instance at 0xb76f3b2c> <<< ERROR >>>

should all hold a unique instance of C(), as seen at initialization time - not the last instance that was created (see <<< OK >>> lines).

What happened here?

share|improve this question
    
Can you reduce error on fewer lines? –  Luka Rahne Jun 7 '11 at 6:55
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It looks like you are trying to "declare" instance attributes at the class level. Class attributes have their own specific uses in Python, and it is wrong to put them there if you are not intending to ever use the class attributes

class A():
    name = None  # Don't do this
    b = None     # Don't do this
    def __init__(self, name, bname, cname, dname):
        self.name = name
        print "A: name", name
        self.b = B(name, bname, cname, dname)
        print "A self.b:", self.b

In class B you have created a class attribute l. Since the instance doesn't have it's own attribute l it uses the class's attribute.

You could just write your class B like this instead

class B():
    def __init__(self, name, bname, cname, dname):
        self.aname = name
        self.name = bname
        self.l = dict()
        print " B: name", bname
        self.c = C(bname, cname, dname)
        self.l["bb"] = self.c
        print " B self:", self
        print " B self.c:", self.c
        print " B self.l[bb]:", self.l["bb"], "<<< OK >>>"

...
share|improve this answer
    
That really puts things into different perspective - thank you! –  Hinko Kocevar Jun 7 '11 at 7:37
    
@Hinko, you are most welcome –  gnibbler Jun 7 '11 at 11:28
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What happened is that you created a class attribute. Create an instance attribute instead by instantiating in __init__().

share|improve this answer
3  
+1 for brevity, clarity, and also for resisting the initial urge to run when facing a wall of code :) –  uʍop ǝpısdn Jun 7 '11 at 6:45
    
Thanks for helping a total noob :), since I needed to look the second answer to finally understand :( –  Hinko Kocevar Jun 7 '11 at 7:36
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