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I am trying to filter a single table (master) by the values in multiple other tables (filter1, filter2, filter3 ... filterN) using only joins.

I want the following rules to apply:

(A) If one or more rows exist in a filter table, then include only those rows from the master that match the values in the filter table.

(B) If no rows exist in a filter table, then ignore it and return all the rows from the master table.

(C) This solution should work for N filter tables in combination.

(D) Static SQL using JOIN syntax only, no Dynamic SQL.

I'm really trying to get rid of dynamic SQL wherever possible, and this is one of those places I truly think it's possible, but just can't quite figure it out. Note: I have solved this using Dynamic SQL already, and it was fairly easy, but not particularly efficient or elegant.


What I have tried:

  1. Various INNER JOINS between master and filter tables - works for (A) but fails on (B) because the join removes all records from the master (left) side when the filter (right) side has no rows.

  2. LEFT JOINS - Always returns all records from the master (left) side. This fails (A) when some filter tables have records and some do not.


What I really need:

It seems like what I need is to be able to INNER JOIN on each filter table that has 1 or more rows and LEFT JOIN (or not JOIN at all) on each filter table that is empty.

My question: How would I accomplish this without resorting to Dynamic SQL?

share|improve this question
    
What are those 'filters'? Values that are allowed, regexes? What types are they? –  Piotr Auguscik Jun 7 '11 at 7:29
    
Piotr - the 'filters' are just single-column tables where the column name matches against a column name in the master table. each 'filter' table acts as a way of reducing the results coming from the master by filtering it on one of the master columns. I hope this helps. –  MrChips Jun 7 '11 at 18:13

6 Answers 6

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In SQL Server 2005+ you could try this:

WITH
  filter1 AS (
    SELECT DISTINCT
      m.ID,
      HasMatched = CASE WHEN f.ID IS NULL THEN 0 ELSE 1 END,
      AllHasMatched = MAX(CASE WHEN f.ID IS NULL THEN 0 ELSE 1 END) OVER ()
    FROM masterdata m
      LEFT JOIN filtertable1 f ON join_condition
  ),
  filter2 AS (
    SELECT DISTINCT
      m.ID,
      HasMatched = CASE WHEN f.ID IS NULL THEN 0 ELSE 1 END,
      AllHasMatched = MAX(CASE WHEN f.ID IS NULL THEN 0 ELSE 1 END) OVER ()
    FROM masterdata m
      LEFT JOIN filtertable2 f ON join_condition
  ),
  …
SELECT m.*
FROM masterdata m
  INNER JOIN filter1 f1 ON m.ID = f1.ID AND f1.HasMatched = f1.AllHasMatched
  INNER JOIN filter2 f2 ON m.ID = f2.ID AND f2.HasMatched = f2.AllHasMatched
  …

My understanding is, filter tables without any matches simply must not affect the resulting set. The output should only consist of those masterdata rows that have matched all the filters where matches have taken place.

share|improve this answer
    
I think you are on to something here. I'm going to take this and go fiddle around with it for a while to see if it works. If so, you get the "accepted answer"... –  MrChips Jun 9 '11 at 4:16
    
See my response to @Faester above. Your reasoning here lead me down the DISCTINCT path I mentioned in that comment... Getting there, but just not perfect... –  MrChips Jun 15 '11 at 21:51
    
I ended up going with this solution. –  MrChips Nov 16 '11 at 0:36
SELECT *
FROM master_table mt
WHERE (0 = (select count(*) from filter_table_1)
      OR mt.id IN (select id from filter_table_1)
  AND (0 = (select count(*) from filter_table_2)
      OR mt.id IN (select id from filter_table_2)
  AND (0 = (select count(*) from filter_table_3)
      OR mt.id IN (select id from filter_table_3)

Be warned that this could be inefficient in practice. Unless you have a specific reason to kill your existing, working, solution, I would keep it.

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Do inner join to get results for (A) only and do left join to get results for (B) only (you will have to put something like this in the where clause: filterN.column is null) combine results from inner join and left join with UNION.

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Left Outer Join - gives you the MISSING entries in master table ....

SELECT * FROM MASTER M INNER JOIN APPRENTICE A ON A.PK = M.PK LEFT OUTER JOIN FOREIGN F ON F.FK = M.PK

If FOREIGN has keys that is not a part of MASTER you will have "null columns" where the slots are missing

I think that is what you looking for ...

Mike

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Mike - I am trying to understand what you have done here with the 'apprentice' and 'foreign' tables. Are the 'apprentice' and 'foreign' tables intended as aliases for one of the 'filter' tables in my description? –  MrChips Jun 7 '11 at 18:16
    
yes - some sort of hieraki :) –  Mike Jun 7 '11 at 19:34

First off, it is impossible to have "N number of Joins" or "N number of filters" without resorting to dynamic SQL. The SQL language was not designed for dynamic determination of the entities against which you are querying.

Second, one way to accomplish what you want (but would be built dynamically) would be something along the lines of:

Select ...
From master
Where Exists    (
                Select 1
                From filter_1
                Where filter_1 = master.col1
                Union All
                Select 1
                From ( Select 1 )
                Where Not Exists    (
                                    Select 1
                                    From filter_1
                                    )
                Intersect
                Select 1
                From filter_2
                Where filter_2 = master.col2
                Union All
                Select 1
                From ( Select 1 )
                Where Not Exists    (
                                    Select 1
                                    From filter_2
                                    )
                ...
                Intersect
                Select 1
                From filter_N
                Where filter_N = master.colN
                Union All
                Select 1
                From ( Select 1 )
                Where Not Exists    (
                                    Select 1
                                    From filter_N
                                    )
                        )
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Thomas - I probably should have been more clear on my "N joins" definition. What I meant by this is that I am looking for a solution that is repeatable in that it will work for as many tables as I need to join on. The number of tables in the query is static, but the solution should extend to as many static 'JOINS' as i need. That's all. I was trying to avoid wasting people's time on solutions that only work for a single filter table etc... :-) –  MrChips Jun 7 '11 at 18:19
    
@MrChips - Just so I understand, you are not trying to have a query that dynamically determines tables or columns right? –  Thomas Jun 7 '11 at 20:38
    
No, the tables and columns involved are fully known at the time I am writing the query. The only thing that is "dynamic" is that I might want to add more tables/columns later, for instance if i determine I need more query filters. –  MrChips Jun 9 '11 at 4:13

I have previously posted a - now deleted - answer based on wrong assumptions on you problems.

But I think you could go for a solution where you split your initial search problem into a matter of constructing the set of ids from the master table, and then select the data joining on that set of ids. Here I naturally assume you have a kind of ID on your master table. The filter tables contains the filter values only. This could then be combined into the statement below, where each SELECT in the eligble subset provides a set of master ids, these are unioned to avoid duplicates and that set of ids are joined to the table with data.

    SELECT * FROM tblData INNER JOIN 
    (
        SELECT id FROM tblData td 
            INNER JOIN fa on fa.a = td.a
        UNION 
        SELECT id FROM tblData td 
            INNER JOIN fb on fb.b = td.b
        UNION 
        SELECT id FROM tblData td 
            INNER JOIN fc on fc.c = td.c
    ) eligible ON eligible.id = tblData.id

The test has been made against the tables and values shown below. These are just an appendix.

    CREATE TABLE tblData (id int not null primary key identity(1,1), a varchar(40), b datetime, c int)

    CREATE TABLE fa (a varchar(40) not null primary key)
    CREATE TABLE fb (b datetime  not null primary key)
    CREATE TABLE fc (c int not null primary key)
share|improve this answer
    
This is similar to another line of reasoning that I am looking into at the moment as well. I'll keep this suggestion in mind as I am playing with it. I'll let you (and everyone else here) know how it goes. Thanks for this! –  MrChips Jun 9 '11 at 4:20
    
@MrChips: Did you find any progress? –  faester Jun 10 '11 at 19:19
    
I am still trying to solve this particular problem. I have found a solution, but it is a bit of a hack. If you find that one of the filters will be empty, you can make it work properly by pre-filling it with a DISCTINCT list of all values from the column it is going to filter against. This allows all values to match on that column, essentially negating that filter (which was the intent when the provided values are empty/null). It runs fine, but it's not as performant as I'd like since you need to perform the SELECT DISTINCT to pre-fill it. Still looking for a better way... –  MrChips Jun 15 '11 at 21:49

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