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I am struggling to pull media out for my templates using the STATIC_URL variable. For example I have this code

{% extends "admin/change_list.html" %}
{% load i18n %}

{% block extrahead %}
<!--[if IE]>
<script type="text/javascript" src="{% firstof STATIC_URL MEDIA_URL %}django_qbe/js/excanvas.js"></script>
<![endif]-->
<script type="text/javascript" src="{% firstof STATIC_URL MEDIA_URL %}django_qbe/js/jquery.js"></script>

Each time the template loads it tries to pull off the MEDIA_URL. If I change it to

{% extends "admin/change_list.html" %}
{% load i18n %}
{% load static %}
{% block extrahead %}
<!--[if IE]>
<script type="text/javascript" src="{% get_static_prefix %}django_qbe/js/excanvas.js"></script>
<![endif]-->
<script type="text/javascript" src="{% get_static_prefix %}django_qbe/js/jquery.js"></script>

My question is why doesn't my first version of this template work?

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2  
Do you use RequestContext? –  DrTyrsa Jun 7 '11 at 7:22
    
i'm using the zip downloaded version of this app versae.github.com/qbe from what i see he is using RequestContext. –  mongoose_za Jun 7 '11 at 7:37
    
My guess would that you don't have "django.core.context_processors.media" in your TEMPLATE_CONTEXT_PROCESSORS –  DrTyrsa Jun 7 '11 at 7:40
    
I have 'django.core.context_processors.media', in my settings.py –  mongoose_za Jun 7 '11 at 7:42

5 Answers 5

up vote 39 down vote accepted

There is a static context-processor, which isn't the same as the media one. You need to make sure you have django.core.context_processors.static in your context-processor list, so it can add STATIC_URL to the context.

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From the docs:

If {{ STATIC_URL }} isn't working in your template, you're probably not using RequestContext when rendering the template.

https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/howto/static-files/

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1  
This solved my issue, but now I have to add the RequestContext(request) argument to my render_to_response call. Is there a more "django" way to do this? –  Seaux Jan 5 '13 at 19:28
    
You can just use the render() method, which auto uses the RequestContext - link to the docs –  tatlar Feb 8 '13 at 19:22

Most things have already been mentioned but to compile and add a little:

  1. Make sure your settings.py file correctly specifies the locations of your static files. As Steven Keith wrote, you should have something like:

    # Absolute path to the directory static files should be collected to.
    # Don't put anything in this directory yourself; store your static files
    # in apps' "static/" subdirectories and in STATICFILES_DIRS.
    # Example: "/home/media/media.lawrence.com/static/"
    STATIC_ROOT = ''
    
    STATIC_URL = '/static/'
    
    ADMIN_MEDIA_PREFIX = '/static/admin/'
    
    import os
    # Additional locations of static files
    STATICFILES_DIRS = (
        os.path.join(os.path.dirname(__file__), 'static'),
    )
    
  2. Then make sure that your TEMPLATE_CONTEXT_PROCESSORS include 'django.core.context_processors.static'. If there's no entry for TEMPLATE_CONTEXT_PROCESSORS in your settings.py, then it defaults to the below, and you're all good.

    TEMPLATE_CONTEXT_PROCESSORS = (
        'django.core.context_processors.debug',
        'django.core.context_processors.i18n',
        'django.core.context_processors.media',
        'django.core.context_processors.static',
        'django.contrib.auth.context_processors.auth',
        'django.contrib.messages.context_processors.messages',
    )
    
  3. Make sure that you use RequestContext when you render your templates. django.shortcuts.render does this by default (see here), so you could just call

    from django.shortcuts import render
    
    def myViewFunction(request):
        return render(request, 'myTemplate.html')
    

    Be careful as django.shortcuts.render_to_response doesn't do this for you unless you add an argument, so you'd have to write something like

    from django.shortcuts import render_to_response
    
    def myViewFunction(request):
        return render_to_response('myTemplate.html', myContext, context_instance=RequestContext(request))
    
share|improve this answer

As I've been accused of not answering the question, let me clarify me thought process:

My question is why doesn't my first version of this template work?

STATIC_URL is returning a False value

To determine why, here is the steps I would use:

  • Try printing it in your templates body - {{ STATIC_URL }}.

  • Check settings.py to ensure the value is set - STATIC_URL = '/static/'

Check whether you have the STATIC files set up properly in runserver:

https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/1.3/ref/contrib/staticfiles/

For reference I use:

# Absolute path to the directory static files should be collected to.
# Don't put anything in this directory yourself; store your static files
# in apps' "static/" subdirectories and in STATICFILES_DIRS.
# Example: "/home/media/media.lawrence.com/static/"
STATIC_ROOT = ''

STATIC_URL = '/static/'

ADMIN_MEDIA_PREFIX = '/static/admin/'

# Additional locations of static files
STATICFILES_DIRS = (
    os.path.join(PROJECT_DIR, 'static'),
)

or an Apache alias:

Alias /static /Users/stevenkeith/foo/bar/static

<Directory /Users/stevenkeith/foo/bar/static>
    Order deny,allow
    Allow from all
</Directory>

or whatever method you want, nginx, etc

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If you don't have an answer, why not to use comments? –  DrTyrsa Jun 7 '11 at 8:58
1  
It is an answer. It's explaining how he/she should go about debugging the problem. –  Steven Keith Jun 7 '11 at 9:00
    
Easier to read this way as well. –  Steven Keith Jun 7 '11 at 9:00
1  
@Steven Keith Have you read the question? It is 'why?'. Have you answered it? No. Comments are for comments (clarifying questions, etc.), answers are for answers, I don't understand why use one instead of another. –  DrTyrsa Jun 7 '11 at 9:12
    
I tried to print the {{ STATIC_URL }} and it came back blank. I have made sure STATIC_URL = '/static/' is there and staticfiles works because I can access my files using {% get_static_prefix %}. I'm using the local development server. –  mongoose_za Jun 7 '11 at 12:26

For me, the answer was simply to stop using STATIC_URL, and instead use the following:

I changed mine from

<link href="{{ STATIC_URL }}css/survey.less" media="screen" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>

to:

<link href="{% static "css/style.less" %}" media="screen" rel="stylesheet" type="text/less"/>

And now it works fine. Much simpler, and I suspect this is also the slightly "more correct" way to use static now (as of Django 1.4) anyways. Please see the Django docs for more info on the specifics.

Dont forget to add {% load static from staticfiles %} at the top of your templates that use it too.

share|improve this answer
    
This definitely the way to go with a newer Django version (v1.6=<) –  Oz123 Dec 11 '13 at 13:23

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