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the question title seems pretty confusing, but this is what i want to achieve.

i have two classes

1. Category
2. Validation

In Category Class i have the following Class Property

public  $error;    //holds all errors in an array.
private $dbh;      //Database object Handle(PDO).
private $validate; //Holds Validation Object
private $data = array('categoryName',
                      'subCategoryName',
                      'prefix',
                      'categoryId',
                      'subCategoryId');

in Validation Class i have defined a method.

public function required($fields = array()) {
    foreach($fields as $field) {
        if(empty(__CLASS__::data[$field])) {

        }
    }
}

now when i call the method $this->validate->required() within the class Category it should check the condition if $data[field] of Category class is empty or got any value in it. hence i have used the following syntax which does not seems to work. if(empty(__CLASS__::data[$field]))what the condition should check is if the class property $data of the class it is being called from (it is class Category in this case) is empty or not. what is the correct syntax for fetching the class property dynamically?

thank you..

share|improve this question
    
So, you're trying to access $data which sits in Category from Validation, or did I mix something?? –  Yoshi Jun 7 '11 at 7:45
    
yes exactly this is what i want, and also keep in mind Validation will be called from Category. –  Ibrahim Azhar Armar Jun 7 '11 at 7:47
    
Since $data isn't static, it belongs to the instantiated Category object, so that is what you need in the context of the required() function. Simplest way is just pass it as a parameter... –  J.C. Inacio Jun 7 '11 at 7:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Give your Category instance as parameter to your validation function. You should have something like this:

public function required($category, $fields = array()) {
    foreach($fields as $field) {
        if(empty($category->data[$field])) {

        }
    }
}

$this->validate->required($this);

Also you do not use a static method, as mentioned in your questions headline in your example. If you have a static function in Validation you would call it like this:

Validation::required($this);

In this case, you do not need a reference to a Validation instance in your Category class at all.

share|improve this answer
    
wow, just the kind of solution i was looking for, this works like charm, thank you so much.. :) –  Ibrahim Azhar Armar Jun 7 '11 at 8:01

Use get_class_vars(): $class_vars = get_class_vars(__CLASS__);. Be aware of possible visibility problems for private $data, as according to the documentation get_class_vars() returns the properties that can be accessed from the current scope.

share|improve this answer
    
that function returns the class property from Validation whereas i want to fetch class Property of Category. –  Ibrahim Azhar Armar Jun 7 '11 at 7:56
    
Oh, my bad, misunderstood. Still, an useful function to know. –  Shadikka Jun 7 '11 at 11:13

I think the best way would be, to not access the data in Category directly, but to add it as a parameter to your validation method.

Like:

public function required($fields = array(), $required = array()) ...

Because otherwise, you're purposly working around encapsulation.

If you still want to go this way, declare $data as public static, or use php reflection.

share|improve this answer

Not sure what your are trying to do , if you want to access Category properties in Validation, you can pass $data to your function call:

// you could call required() this way ...
$this->validate->required($data);

// In validate::required()
public function required($fields = array()) {
  foreach($fields as $field) {
      if(empty($data[$field])) {

      }
    }
}

Now, of course you could set the data as static, but it is not a good use of static variables, especially since you already have a reference in parent class.

private static $data = array('categoryName',
                             'subCategoryName',
                             'prefix',
                             'categoryId',
                            'subCategoryId');

 // and access it through :: operator in validation.
  public function required() {
    $fields = Category::$data;
  foreach($fields as $field) {
      if(empty($data[$field])) {

      }
    }
 }

So, I think you are on the right track without using static, except one thing you are missing, if you want validation object inside category, don't forget to create an instance of it, here is a simple way to pass your instance in a dependecy-injected manner that makes for easier testing:

  class Category{
    private $validate; //Holds Validation Object


    // constructer with type hinting, 
    public function  __construct(Validator $validation){

    // set validator object to this objects property.
    $this->validate = $validation;  
    }

 }

 //create validator instance
 $validator = new Validator;

 // Pass it off to category,

 $category = new Category($validator);
share|improve this answer
    
i didn't get the last line of the code? is is type hinting? –  Ibrahim Azhar Armar Jun 7 '11 at 19:32
    
No, type hinting is always in the function / method's signature. It only works for objects and arrays, but is useful to enforce proper type was passed to the method. See this lovely man page for more detailed examples. –  stefgosselin Jun 7 '11 at 19:44

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