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A long time back, I read a great article that describes a cross-browser friendly way to size text using CSS. The strategy described is as such:

body {
    font-size:100%;
    line-height:1.125em; /* 16×1.125=18 */
}
.bodytext p {
    font-size:0.875em; /* 16x.875=14 */
}
.sidenote {
    font-size:0.75em; /* 16x0.75=12 */
}

This strategy works great on every browser except Safari on the iPhone, which always seems to enlarge certain bits of text. Is there any strategy to prevent this from happening?

Normally my solution would be to add -webkit-text-size-adjust: none; to prevent the iPhone from enlarging the size of the text, but I recently came across this article, which describes that it doesn't allow users to zoom in on the text on ANY Safari browser - clearly a problem. I know that there is a CSS-only solution out there, but I can't find it. I just want to know how I should go about setting font-sizes so that they display the same on all browsers, including the iPhone.

Update: To show an example, if you look at this on an iPhone, you'll notice that the text in the paragraph is significantly larger than the rest of the text around the site. Why is this text singled out, and is there any way that I can tell just by looking at the code that that will happen?

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1  
Remember that accessibility standards may prevent you from fully achieving what you are asking. Fixed font sizes are a nightmare for visual impaired people. –  Rippo Jun 7 '11 at 13:52
    
I don't want the font-sizes to necessarily be "fixed", I just want them to all display the same size by default. –  Wex Jun 7 '11 at 17:38
    
In that case your only solution is to use a image rather than text. I think you are asking the impossible here. –  Rippo Jun 7 '11 at 17:56
1  
@Wex there is no font-size declared for that style #content .article. Maybe if you declare one explicitly? –  Jason Gennaro Jun 9 '11 at 16:56
1  
@Wex If it works, it is because - as far as I know - iPhone gets the width of the element and determines an appropriate text scale so that the content is legible... if no font-size is explicitly set. –  Jason Gennaro Jun 9 '11 at 17:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted
+50

You have a technique you're happy with, but with one downside:

This strategy works great on every browser except Safari on the iPhone, which always seems to enlarge certain bits of text. Is there any strategy to prevent this from happening?

..

Normally my solution would be to add -webkit-text-size-adjust: none; to prevent the iPhone from enlarging the size of the text, but I recently came across this article, which describes that it doesn't allow users to zoom in on the text on ANY Safari browser - clearly a problem. I know that there is a CSS-only solution out there, but I can't find it.

Looking at style.css from http://html5boilerplate.com/mobile/

/* Prevent mobile zooming while remain desktop zooming.
   github.com/shichuan/mobile-html5-boilerplate/issues/closed#issue/14
 */
body {
    -webkit-text-size-adjust: 100%;
        -ms-text-size-adjust: none;
}

That sounds like exactly what you're after, especially when you read the comment in the link:

Just a suggestion, it seems like a good idea to set -webkit-text-size-adjust to 100% instead of none. Setting it to none prevents font zooming in desktop WebKit browsers, which seems like an accessibility issue. Mobile Safari's default value is over 100%, which is why text is bigger -- so if you set it to 100% instead of none, fonts stay the correct size on mobile but can still be zoomed on desktop.

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Thank you for that very informative answer. I'll test it out and let you know what I see. –  Wex Jun 10 '11 at 3:13
    
This only leads to my next concern of "valid" CSS. I'd still be interested in seeing if there was a fix that didn't require browser-specific CSS. –  Wex Jun 10 '11 at 3:14
2  
@Wex: Did you get a chance to try this yet? Regarding "valid" CSS - the CSS is "valid", in every sense that matters. This is a "feature" that's specific to one browser (Mobile Safari), so naturally you are going to need "browser-specific CSS". I can't see any way around that.. –  thirtydot Jun 11 '11 at 22:13
    
Thanks for the help. –  Wex Jun 14 '11 at 17:55
    
this just fixed my issue. 1 Mil thanks! :) –  DiNovici Sep 26 '12 at 18:34

From my experience, use pixels and not points, Macs and PCs display points differently, whereas pixels are more or less the same (to be honest there is always a difference, but with pixels it's less noticeable).

Also, the line-height, unfortunately there is always a difference, (even between Safari and Firefox on the mac), but you can always use conditional styles for Internet Explorer, and if needed, use javascript solutions for Firefox's line-height.

Finally, some fonts can display differently cross-browser, it's a matter of testing.

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I understand they display differently - my question is how to fix these differences –  Wex Jun 7 '11 at 8:52
    
@Wex Even using pixels? and using a font supported by most browsers? those are my two main solution. –  jackJoe Jun 7 '11 at 9:11
    
@Wex - In short, what jackJoe is saying is that if you're using pixels and fonts supported by every browser (the latter still technically not possible, even with so-called "web safe" fonts), you can't fix the differences. Simply put, things will look different on every browser, and for some things, there's nothing you can do about it. This isn't paper design, and shouldn't be treated as such. It's better to embrace, or at least account for, the differences that can't be changed. Otherwise you'll go nuts trying to get everything identical in every browser imaginable. –  Shauna Jun 7 '11 at 12:36
    
@Shauna I said that using pixels + normal fonts, normally works weel cross-browser. The OP hasn't yet replied to confirm if he/she is using this combo. It may look different but there are degrees of difference, and I think the next step is for @Wex to post some code and then we can test it and see those differences. –  jackJoe Jun 7 '11 at 13:44
    
@jackJoe - Even with the "normal" or "web safe" fonts, though, not every browser for every platform will look identical (webspaceworks.com/resources/fonts-web-typography/41). My point is that this should be something to account for, since it seems to me that the questioner is looking to try to change something that at best will have some variance even under the best/most reliable circumstances. Like you said, though, we're just speculating until he gives us more info to go on. –  Shauna Jun 7 '11 at 14:04

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