Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My code is simply as this:

UPDATED:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>

using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
  ifstream r("foo.bin", ios::binary);
  ofstream w("foo.bin", ios::binary);
  int i;

  int ints[10] = {0,1,2,3,4,5,6,8,9};
  w.write((char*)&ints, sizeof(ints));

  int in_ints[10];
  r.read((char*)&in_ints, sizeof(in_ints));

  for(i = 0;i < 10;i++) {
    cout << in_ints[i] << " ";
  }
  cout << endl;

  return 0;
}

Now, the write portion appears to be successful, for example running the od command with 32 bit longs (my system is 32 bit) will display the correct sequence, including a hex dump.

Reading however, I get random sequences such and negative integers that should not happen (it is split up, and mostly zeros as my integers are small, the sign bits should not be on.)

Do you see why my read method has failed to work, when it is really an opposite of my write method?

share|improve this question
    
please post a complete piece of code. –  Donotalo Jun 7 '11 at 7:57
3  
Is this your actual code? If so, you might want to try closing or at least flushing the writing stream before using the reading stream. –  Sven Jun 7 '11 at 7:58
    
I apologize, I have posted the whole code. Let me try flushing the stream. –  John S. Jun 7 '11 at 7:59
    
Ah, my lack of C++ knowledge in its entirety.. If you could post this as a response Sven, I could accept it. It works. –  John S. Jun 7 '11 at 8:00
    
You don't know whether the call to read succeeded. Always check return values. –  n.m. Jun 7 '11 at 8:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

try w.flush() or w.close() before r.read. the problem is when you write it usually bufferes text and doesn't save it in file. so there is nothing realy in file for r.read.

share|improve this answer

This code:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
using namespace std;

int main() {
    {
        ofstream w( "foo.txt" );
        int ints[10] = {0,1,2,3,4,5,6,8,9};
        w.write((char*)&ints, sizeof(ints));
    }
    {
        ifstream r( "foo.txt" );
        int in_ints[10];
        r.read((char*)&in_ints, sizeof(in_ints));
        for( int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
            cout << in_ints[i] << " ";
        }
    }
}

prints:

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 8 9 0

Note there are some numbers missing from your initialisation.

share|improve this answer
    
Yep, +1 from me. Define your variables as late as possible (think of YAGNI), and as local as possible. –  sbi Jun 7 '11 at 8:04
    
A nice example actually, I've tried to see use for scope operators in C++, and maybe this could be a way. I wonder if relying on out of scope to call the deconstructor is a good way however, as I may change it later and forget to add the .close(). –  John S. Jun 7 '11 at 8:13
1  
@John: it is the right way to go. –  ybungalobill Jun 7 '11 at 8:30

Data written to a file isn't necessarily visible to other streams (in the same process or not) until the file is closed, or at least flushed. And if the file "foo.bin" doesn't exist before you start the program, opening it for reading will fail (and so all further use will be a no-op). Your program violates one of the most basic rules of programming: if anything can fail, always check that it hasn't before continuing. You don't check any of the results of your IO.

I might also add that reading and writing data this way is very, very fragile, and can generally only be guaranteed to work within the same process—even recompiling with a different version of the compiler or different compiler options may cause the data representation to change, with the results that you won't be able to read data written earlier. In the case of arrays of int, of course, this is highly unlikely as long as you don't change machine architectures. But in general, if you'll need to reread the data in the future, it's a technique best avoided. (The (char*) are reinterpret_cast, and as we know, reinterpret_cast is a very strong signal that there is a portability issue.)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.