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I've got class A that implements IA.
Now I need to create class B that should implement also IA. Class B has instance of class A as a member.

Is there any way to define that A's instance implements the IA in class B?

interfase IA {
    void method1();
    void method2();
    .
    .
    .
    .
    void methodN();
}

class A:IA {
    public void method1(){}
    public void method2(){}
    .
    .
    .
    .
    public void methodN(){}
}

class B:IA {
    private IA m_a;
    public B(IA a) {
      m_a=a;
    }

    //Instead all of this I am looking of a way to define that m_a is the implement to IA of B
    public void method1(){ use of a.method1 }
    public void method2(){ use of a.method2 }
    .
    .
    .
    .
    public void methodN(){ use of a.methodN }
}
share|improve this question
1  
You can inherit B from A. –  Alex Aza Jun 7 '11 at 8:08
    
@Alex Aza: see what I've wrote to @DanielB. –  Naor Jun 7 '11 at 8:15
    
Perfectly valid feature request, Delphi has something like this. But C# does not. And I wonder if the pattern is very common. –  Henk Holterman Jun 7 '11 at 8:23
    
@Henk Holterman: Can you explain more about Delphi's solution for this? –  Naor Jun 7 '11 at 8:25
    
Roughly: class Foo : IBar { IBar MyProp implements IBar; } –  Henk Holterman Jun 7 '11 at 8:28

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If B is really supposed to implement IA, then B must redefine each of the interface methods one by one, even if each implementation is simply a call to the implementation of the encapsulated A member.

Nevertheless, there is a lazy way which can prevent you from all this tedious stuff and which can be considered almost as the same, from a practical point of view :

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        CatOwner Bob = new CatOwner();
        Console.WriteLine(((Cat)Bob).Cry);
        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

interface ICry
{
    string Cry { get; }
}

class Cat : ICry
{
    public string Cry { get { return "Meow !"; } }
}

class CatOwner
{
    private Cat _MyCat;

    public CatOwner()
    {
        _MyCat = new Cat();
    }

    public static implicit operator Cat(CatOwner po)
    {
        return po._MyCat;
    }
}

CatOwner doesn't really implement Cry since the cat owner is not the one who meows : his cat does. But as an approximation we could consider that by demanding to the cat owner to cry, we of course mean that this demand actually targets his cat, not the owner itself. Then we "cast the cat owner to his cat" and then we can make him Cry.

That's pretty funny, no ? :-)

Edit :

That said, Magnus' answer is highly worth considering IMHO. It appears more logical and more clean if passing a member is fine considering the semantic context. My solution may be still interesting if B is just a kind of enhanced variety of A which cannot be inherited (sealed), or in such a particular context... Really depends on the context and the semantic constraints...

share|improve this answer

Not really, you're probably going to want to define some sort of interface that returns the IA member, like the Enumerable/Enumerator pattern.

public interface IB
{
   public IA Item { get; }
}

Then B could simply return the instance you're storing in it.

public class B : IB
{
    public IA Item { get; private set; }
}

A could even implement IB

public class A : IA, IB
{
    public void Method1();
    //...
    public void MethodN();

    IA IB.Item
    {
        get
        {
            return this;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
A should not know about B. B must implement IA because somewhere I have a module that accept only IA. But B actually hold more data than IA allows. –  Naor Jun 7 '11 at 8:20
    
have you considered using the Dynamic Object class? winterdom.com/2009/05/dynamicobject-in-c-40 –  Philipp Jun 7 '11 at 8:29

Derive B from A is all what you need.

class B:A {

    public B() {

    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I can't derive from A because A is not always be the implemant of IA. Later I will have C that will implement IA and I would like that C's instance will replace B's IA implemantation. –  Naor Jun 7 '11 at 8:12
1  
Then you may create an abstract class which implements IA and derive from that. If your interface is that complex and each class has a unique implementation of each property / function you have to write it for each class which implements this interface. –  DanielB Jun 7 '11 at 8:15
    
The problem that in my real world B already inherit from someone. –  Naor Jun 7 '11 at 8:20
    
As the code posted by you, B's constructor take a parameter of IA, so you dnt need to do anything more, you pass class C,A etc with IA implementation, just dnt inherit IA in class B and used the passed parameter. –  BreakHead Jun 7 '11 at 8:22
    
An information I didn't had. If this is a very common task for you you could think about a Code-Generation-Tool or a t4 template. –  DanielB Jun 7 '11 at 8:24

You basically have two options: inherit from A, or encapsulate A. This is basically the difference between two design patterns: encapsulation and inheritance.

share|improve this answer
    
I know the options I have - I am looking for something I don't know to save many lines of code. –  Naor Jun 7 '11 at 8:16

Not sure, but why are you inheritting class B from IA? you already have an instance of object A in class B, you can use that...

share|improve this answer
    
I don't have instance of object A in class B. I have instance of something that implements IA. –  Naor Jun 7 '11 at 8:17
    
Ya I got it you are taking IA as parameter..but Suppose if A implement IA you will pass A, if C implement IA you will pass C, so you access those implemented Method right??/ –  BreakHead Jun 7 '11 at 8:25
    
Not exactly. On runtime I can call this method: public ChangeIA(IA ia) {m_a=ia;} and the implementation will changed. –  Naor Jun 7 '11 at 8:27
    
I dnt see any prblm in this???.. Suppose when I created an Instance of B I passed A and it will set m_a = A, and if I want to change the implemetation to C I will call Change(C); this will set m_a = C, and B will use C implemented methods?? so wats wrong in this?? –  BreakHead Jun 7 '11 at 8:34
    
I don't understand what you suggest. –  Naor Jun 7 '11 at 8:46

How about exposing the "implementer" in a property instead of B implementering the interface.

class B
{
  public IA Implementer {get; private set;}
  public B(IA a) 
  {
      Implementer = a;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
B must implement IA because somewhere I have a module that accept only IA. But B actually hold more data than IA allows. –  Naor Jun 7 '11 at 8:22
    
Then you would just send in b.Implementer to your module, instead if B –  Magnus Jun 7 '11 at 8:23
    
Understand what you said but this is not possible in the way the module built.. –  Naor Jun 7 '11 at 9:57

Looking at your question from design perspective, it is a perfectly valid question (in a more complicated real life situation) and it would be nice to save a lot of lines of code by just saying that member m_a is the one that implements all the IA interface in B.

I don't quite agree with the suggestions to inherit B from A: 1- in real life, B could inherit from another class unrelated, or say you are implementing IC, and ID, and have members m_c and m_d would be nice to be able to point the implementation of C to m_c and implementation fo ID to m_d..etc 2- replacing aggregation with inheritance is usually a bad design.

Nice idea though..

share|improve this answer
    
For me it looks like something that is must.. telling somehow that m_a is the implamantation of IA and if in B there is "override" to IA's implementation - it will replace m_a's implementation or something like this. –  Naor Jun 7 '11 at 8:24

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