Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
Javascript: Setting window.location.href versus window.location

When I tested these code in browser, it seems like they are same. Is there any difference?

1

window.location = "http://stackoverflow.com";

2

window.location.href = "http://stackoverflow.com";
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by 99tm, Gilles, Paul D. Waite, Neil Barnwell, Yi Jiang Jun 7 '11 at 10:00

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
@Tim Oh, I couldn't find that. –  Sangdol Jun 7 '11 at 9:23
    
No problem mate - sometimes its worth searching your question first - I just typed your title into the search and it was the first result. –  Tim Jun 7 '11 at 9:25
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Yes, there is a difference. window.location is a Location object. window.location.href is a string representation of the location. The location object's toString() value is the same as the href property, so they are identical if used as strings. Setting window.location is the same as setting window.location.href.

window.location, however, has several other properties you can use, such as location.hostname, location.pathname and location.hash. So you could could set location.hash on its own to alter the hash value.

share|improve this answer
add comment

windows.location adds an item to your history in that you can (or should be able to) click "Back" and go back to the current page. It is an Object.

On the other hand, windows.location.href is a string representation of window.location

share|improve this answer
add comment

window.location is an object with some properties, but window.location.href is only string. In window.location you have for example reload method.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.