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int *a;
void kol() {
    int *c;
    c = (int *) malloc(sizeof(int));
    *c = 10;
    a = c;
}    

main() {
    a = (int *) malloc(sizeof(int));
    a = 1; 
    kol();
        printf("%d", *a);
        getchar();
}        
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closed as not a real question by Jens Gustedt, qrdl, Jeremy W. Sherman, user7116, David Thornley Jun 8 '11 at 21:51

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

6  
Crank up your compiler warnings and mind the warnings. –  pmg Jun 7 '11 at 9:25
1  
What do you mean by "c saved"? –  RedX Jun 7 '11 at 9:26
2  
Can you please explain your question? what is the output you are getting? what is surprising to you? –  balki Jun 7 '11 at 9:27
1  
Really unsure what your problem is here - this code prints 10? is this not what you expect? –  Elemental Jun 7 '11 at 9:28
    
Error with a = 1, it is a typo, right *a = 1. Sorry. –  Gog Jun 7 '11 at 9:37

4 Answers 4

You're probably asking why the result of the printf is 10.

That is because c is a pointer, which points to a memory you allocated, and the value stored there is 10, as assigned in your function kol.

a is a global variable which is of the same type as c, and in kol, you assign to it the content of c, making a and c pointing to the same value, and that is the value you see printed out.

All the values assigned to a prior to the call to kol are overwritten by the assignment a=c, and lost. This means that you have a memory leak, and a=1 is a meaningless statement.

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There is also a problem with a = 1. That will assign to a the address 1. What you want is *a = 1 probably.

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c isn't static but it's always set to be 10 in the line *c = 10;. There are also several mistakes in this code, one of them being a = 1;. a is a pointer so you set the pointer to point at memory address 0x00000001 which most likely isn't valid. To access the value/memory a is pointing to you'd have to use *a = 1 (like you did with c above). Also note you never free() the memory you aquired and the parameter b seems to be unused.

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This is what i get

  • In the function main you allocated an address to a, saved the value 1 in it (as you corrected the typo in the comment).
  • Then you call another function, allocate an address to a local pointer variable c, assign the value 10 in the location pointed by c.
  • Then you assign address stored in c into a. This operation overwrites the previously stored address in a.
  • Next you access the value stored at a in main, which will gets 10 . This is because is the last step you yourself assigned the address that was stored in c into a by a=c so now, a is pointing to the memory location that was previously pointed by c. The previous contents of a that you allocated in the main was overwritten.
  • Such an operation in reality would lead to a memory leak, as the memory address which was stored in a initially is not freed, and is no more pointed by anyone.

Let the first malloc in main fetch the address 0x1234abcd

Let the next malloc in the kol fetch the address 0xdeadbeef

Here is a diagram to describe the story.

 after: a = (int *) malloc (sizeof (int));
        *a = 1;

                      0x1234abcd
 +---+----------+     +-------+
 | a |0x1234abcd|---->|   1   |
 +---+----------+     +-------+

 after: c = (int *) malloc (sizeof (int));
        *a = 10;

                      0x1234abcd
 +---+----------+     +-------+
 | a |0x1234abcd|---->|   1   |
 +---+----------+     +-------+

                      0xdeadbeef
 +---+----------+     +-------+
 | c |0xdeadbeef|---->|   10  |
 +---+----------+     +-------+



 after: a = c;


                      0x1234abcd
 +---+----------+     +-------+
 | a |0xdeadbeef|--+  |   1   |
 +---+----------+  |  +-------+
                   |
                   |  0xdeadbeef
 +---+----------+  +->+-------+
 | c |0xdeadbeef|---->|   10  |
 +---+----------+     +-------+


 after: back inside main

                      0x1234abcd
 +---+----------+     +-------+
 | a |0xdeadbeef|--+  |   1   |     (memory leak)
 +---+----------+  |  +-------+
                   |
                   |  0xdeadbeef
                   +->+-------+
 (c is destroyed)     |   10  |
                      +-------+

But what is the issue ? Could not understand what do you mean by the two words in the question : "static" , "saved"

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Thanks a lot for the explanation. I thought that the memory allocation by malloc in a function is erased after its implementation. –  Gog Jun 7 '11 at 10:54
    
you need to manually use free on the memory which you got by malloc. –  phoxis Jun 7 '11 at 10:57
    
Thanks again. And.. What's program you used to make this scheme? –  Gog Jun 7 '11 at 11:11
1  
what program ? the ASCII art? its name is homo sapiens . Manually done. and.. if kindly accept the most appropriate answer by checking the tick mark on the answers, if you have the issue resolved. –  phoxis Jun 7 '11 at 11:14

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