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Few years ago I found an implementation of the Singleton pattern in Python by Duncan Booth:

class Singleton(object):
    """
    Singleton class by Duncan Booth.
    Multiple object variables refers to the same object.
    http://web.archive.org/web/20090619190842/http://www.suttoncourtenay.org.uk/duncan/accu/pythonpatterns.html#singleton-and-the-borg
    """
    _instance = None

    def __new__(cls, *args, **kwargs):
        if not cls._instance:
            cls._instance = super(Singleton, cls).__new__(
                               cls, *args, **kwargs)
        return cls._instance

The same approach is also described in question "Is there a simple, elegant way to define Singletons in Python?"

I use the Singleton via sub-classing:
class Settings(Singleton)
class Debug(Singleton)

Recently I made some changes to the program and got this warning:

/media/KINGSTON/Sumid/src/miscutil.py:39: DeprecationWarning: 
object.__new__() takes no parameters
cls._instance = super(Singleton, cls).__new__(cls, *args, **kwargs)

I found explanation (by Guido) about __new__ deprecation which says that the parameters are not used at all. Passing an argument which is not needed can be symptom of a bug.

So I decided to clear the parameters:

class Singleton(object):
_instance = None

def __new__(cls):
    if not cls._instance:
        cls._instance = super(Singleton, cls).__new__()
    return cls._instance

Which resulted in following exception:

Traceback (most recent call last):
 File "sumid.py", line 1168, in <module>
  settings = Settings()
 File "/media/KINGSTON/Sumid/src/miscutil.py", line 45, in __new__
  cls._instance = super(Singleton, cls).__new__()
 TypeError: object.__new__(): not enough arguments

When I modify the line to cls._instance = super(Singleton, cls).__new__(cls), I'll get:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "sumid.py", line 1174, in <module>
    debug = Debug(settings)
TypeError: __new__() takes exactly 1 argument (2 given)

Gimmel suggest another solution: _instance = type.__new__(cls). For me it breaks the inheritance:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "sumid.py", line 1168, in <module>
    settings = Settings()
  File "/media/KINGSTON/Sumid/src/miscutil.py", line 40, in __new__
    _instance = type.__new__(cls)
TypeError: type.__new__(Settings): Settings is not a subtype of type

The same problem has also Menno Smits. But I don't understand the solution suggested. Moreover I have no multiple inheritance in relevant code.

I didn't try the another example in "Is there a simple, elegant way to define Singletons in Python?", but at a glance it probably will have the same problem.

I use the Singleton pattern in a program and I don't want to rewrite it completely just because one warning. Thus following answers wont help me:

  • Singleton is wrong. Don't use the Singleton at all.
  • Use Borg instead, it's more pythonic.
  • Use module instead of a class.

To conclude I'll repeat the question:
How to adapt the Singleton pattern with consideration of the deprecation warning with the minimal impact to existing code?

Edit: Line cls._instance = object.__new__(cls) raises the TypeError when the Child's init takes an argument:

class Child(Singleton):
    def __init__(self,param=None):
        print(param)
        print("Doing another stuff.")

ch = Child("Some stuff") 
share|improve this question
    
You have probably already looked at Alex Martelli's aleax.it/gdd_pydp.pdf (slides 20-..), but anyway. (I just remember him talking about the Singleton's cons in that talk (one can watch it at youtube.com/watch?v=0vJJlVBVTFg)) –  mlvljr Jun 7 '11 at 13:23
1  
@mlvljr interesting. Thanks. But the Singleton pattern on P20 has the same problem - deprecation warning. They solve it with Borg - which will raise the same warning. –  sumid Jun 7 '11 at 13:33
1  
A few links discussing this issue: 1. The bug report that caused the issue 2. A discussion of a similar problem. –  Sven Marnach Jun 7 '11 at 15:09
    
@Sven Thanks. Could you please be more specific with the text linked as first? I don't see there a clue for the inheritance with overridden init or new. Just at the end is outlined the issue and the link to Menno's Musings. Yes, I'm aware of the second link. I state in the original question that I don't understand the solution proposed by Benjamin in discussion below. –  sumid Jun 7 '11 at 19:00
    
@sumid: Sorry, I missed that you linked the second one in your post. Might be the only link of your post I didn't click. The first link is the bug report that discusses if object.__new__() and object.__init__() should accept additional parameters (and ignore them) and if yes, in what circumstances. It also contains a serious of patches to the Python source that show the exact logic when object.__new__() accepts arguments. –  Sven Marnach Jun 7 '11 at 21:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Wow, good to see that something I wrote that long ago is still providing some use even if it does need tweaking nowadays.

You need to drop any additional arguments you are passing when you construct the object. Change the offending line to:

        cls._instance = object.__new__(cls)

or

        cls._instance = super(Singleton, cls).__new__(cls)

though I think you'll be fine with the first (diamond inheritance and singletons sound as though they shouldn't be mixed).

P.S. I did try this suggestion and it works for me so I don't know why it didn't work for you.

share|improve this answer
1  
It raises the Error when the Child's init takes some argument: ` class Child(Singleton): def init__(self,param=None): print param print 'Doing another stuff' ch=Child('Some stuff')` I did think that __new__() goes first and __init goes after that. I don't understand why they should have same parameters. How to solve this? –  sumid Jun 7 '11 at 12:32

So based on the answers from @Sven and @Duncan I found a solution which works for me. The problem actually wasn't in the line of the code raising the TypeError, but in the signature of the __new__() method. The call of the object.__new__(cls) shall be without the *args, **kwargs, but they have to remain in the Singleton.__new__() definition. This is the modified Singleton:

class Singleton(object):
    """
    Singleton class by Duncan Booth.
    Multiple object variables refers to the same object.
    http://www.suttoncourtenay.org.uk/duncan/accu/pythonpatterns.html
    """
   _instance = None

    def __new__(cls, *args, **kwargs):
        if not cls._instance:
            cls._instance = super(Singleton, cls).__new__(cls)
        return cls._instance

And this is an example of sub-classing (which was the issue):

class Child(Singleton):  
    def __init__(self,param=None):  
            print param  
            print 'Doing another stuff'  

ch=Child('Some stuff')

I still don't understand why the signature of Child's __init__() has to match to Singleton's `new(), but this solution works.

share|improve this answer
3  
If A is a class, then A(1, 2, 3) first calls A.__new__(A, 1, 2, 3). If the object obj returned by this call is of type A again, obj.__init__(1, 2, 3) will be called. Note that even for the singleton __init__() is called each time you request the instance. The described behaviour is the behaviour of the standard metaclass type. If you don't like it, you can derive your own metaclass from type and overwrite type.__call__(). –  Sven Marnach Jun 7 '11 at 21:32
    
FWIW, the way things stand nowadays, Duncan's original version with __new__(cls, *args, **kwargs) works in Python 2.7.5, but results in a TypeError: object() takes no parameters in Python 3.3.2. However __new__(cls) works correctly in both. –  martineau Oct 8 '13 at 5:27

I found this pattern described in a Python 3 pattern and idioms source. This should certainly help. I would love to know if it solves your problem, although it may violate the minimal impact condition in your question.

Python 3: The Singleton

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