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So, I'd like to write a logger in c# for an app I'm working on. However, since I love efficiency, I don't want to be opening and closing a log file over and over again during execution.

I think I'd like to write all events to RAM and then write to the log file once when the app exits. Would this be a good practice? If so, how should I implement it?

If this is not a good practice, what would be?

(And I'm not using Windows' event log at this time.)

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Is there a reason why you're not using an existing logging framework like log4net? –  Jackson Pope Jun 7 '11 at 10:56
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Are you sure you'd like to write a logger, or do you just need one? Unless you really need to do it yourself, you might consider checking out some of the existing ones. –  Benjol Jun 7 '11 at 10:57
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In addition to Jackson's comment, NLog has buffered and async IO support. –  Artem Koshelev Jun 7 '11 at 10:58
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Yes, very good practice. If the app crashes you don't want all those logfiles cluttering up your disk. –  Henk Holterman Jun 7 '11 at 11:00
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I like to teach myself by re-inventing the wheel. In the end, if I have to, I can use an existing library, but I like to learn. –  meffordm Jun 7 '11 at 11:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

However, since I love efficiency, I don't want to be opening and closing a log file over and over again during execution

No. It's since you love premature optimizations.

I think I'd like to write all events to RAM and then write to the log file once when the app exits. Would this be a good practice? If so, how should I implement it?

If you love efficiency, why do you want to waste a lot of memory for log entries?

If this is not a good practice, what would be?

It is if you want to lose all logs when your application crashes (since it cannot write the log to disk then). Why did you create the log in the first place?

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Each time the app runs, I want to log what it's doing. My IS Security office is requiring it. –  meffordm Jun 7 '11 at 11:00
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Then it's vital that it's written to disk, right? Why risk that everything is lost by keeping it in the memory? Use an existing logging framework –  jgauffin Jun 7 '11 at 11:05
    
Ok, you've convinced me, for the sake of time, to use an existing framework--NLog in this case. However, I'd still like to write my own logger in the near future. –  meffordm Jun 7 '11 at 11:59
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I do recommend that you do so also. Just to learn. But you'll always save time by using existing ones –  jgauffin Jun 7 '11 at 12:04

You'll have to think of some issues you might encounter:

  • System being shut down while your application runs -> no log files
  • An application crash might not invoke your write method
  • If the log grows large (how long does your application run?), you might get memory problems
  • If the log grows large, and there is not enough space on the drive, not a single log line will be written

You could simply keep the file open while your application runs (with at least FileShare.Read so you can monitor it), or consider writing batches of log lines, invoking the write method after a group of methods, or even using a timer.

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Well if your app crashes, you lose all your logs. Better if you flush the logs to disk at an appropriate moment.. Lazy write:

Queue off the log entries to a seperate logger thread, (ie. store them in some class and queue the class instance to a producer-consumer queue). In the logger thread, wait on the input queue with a timeout. If a log entry comes in, store it in a local cache queue.

If (timeout fires) or (some high water mark of logs stored is reached) then write all cached log entries to the file and flush file buffers.

Rgds, Martin

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