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I found here the method:

public static T GetValue<T>(object value)
{
    if (value == null || value == DBNull.Value)
        return default(T);
    else
        return (T)value;
}

How to rewrite it to obtain null if "value" is NULL?

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2  
null isn't a valid int –  Daniel Hilgarth Jun 7 '11 at 12:08
    
you mean "int?" –  AngeDeLaMort Jun 7 '11 at 12:09
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5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You don't need to rewrite it. You just need to call it as:

GetValue<int?>(value);
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That's right! Thank you! –  Max Kvt Jun 7 '11 at 12:20
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How to rewrite it to obtain null if "value" is NULL?

You can’t – int cannot be null. You can, however, use Nullable<int> instead. But this only works for value types. For instance, it won’t work any more for T == string. In order to accomplish this you will need to write two distinct functions, one for nullable value types and one for reference types.

public T? GetValue<T>(object value) where T : struct
{
    if (value == null || value == DBNull.Value)
        return null;
    else
        return (T?)value;
}

Or, terser:

public T? GetValue<T>(object value) where T : struct
{
    return (value == null value == DBNull.Value) ? null : (T?)value;
}

(In all cases, T? is a shortcut for Nullable<T>.)

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-1 - The code above won't work for reference types - you can't have Nullable<string>. It will be enough to call the original method using int? as T. –  Jakub Konecki Jun 7 '11 at 12:12
1  
@Jakub See update (ninja edit). –  Konrad Rudolph Jun 7 '11 at 12:12
    
@Konrad - but this limits the usage of this general function to value types only - have you seen a database without strings? ;-) –  Jakub Konecki Jun 7 '11 at 12:15
    
@Jakub Don’t ask me – I’d just use an existing database abstraction layer and be done with it. –  Konrad Rudolph Jun 7 '11 at 12:17
    
@Konrad - sorry, I don't get your answer at all - you've suggested that all domain objects that represent tables (that's where this code is probably used - to populate objects from db reader) can only use nullable value types. That's a BIG limitation and I would guess not a desirable one. –  Jakub Konecki Jun 7 '11 at 12:21
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int is a value type not a reference type - it cannot have a value of null.

Consider using int? instead if your INT column in the database is nullable.

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In C#, an int is a value type and therefore cannot be null as Jakub said. However, you can define a variable :

int? thisValue;

This can be set to null.

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what about "int?" ? –  Max Kvt Jun 7 '11 at 12:12
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Do you mean this:

public T GetValue<T>(object value){
if (value == null)
    return null;
else if (value == DBNull.Value)
    return default(T);
else
    return (T)value;

}

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1  
No, he didn’t mean this, and it wouldn’t work anyway. –  Konrad Rudolph Jun 7 '11 at 12:24
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